Delivered and Supported by the Behavioral and Social Sciences Division

History

In order to understand the modern world, you need to understand the past. From American and European History to African American History to Women’s History, we offer a wide range of history courses. If you wish to pursue a career as a historian, our courses will provide you with an excellent foundation. Even if you do not plan to pursue a history related career, our courses will help you thrive as a citizen in the 21st century. 

In addition to gaining an understanding of the people, diverse cultures, and current issues and events, you will also begin to learn how to critically analyze, evaluate and interpret information – skills necessary for living in the modern world.

Earn an Associate Degree, Certificate or take a Course or two

Degree Programs

The requirements for a degree in liberal arts and sciences allow you to transfer seamlessly to most four-year colleges and to successfully complete your bachelor's degree in history without loss of credit or time. 

Associate of Arts Degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Courses


HIS*H101
Western Civilization I
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. Students may not receive credit for His*H104 or 121 in addition to His*H101. This course is an issue-oriented course of Western Civilization from the Ancient World to 1715 from a contemporary perspective. Topics selected on the basis of significance and relevance will include oriental despotism, the origins of political democracy, concepts and codes of justice, the first federal empire, feudalism and the emergence of secular nation – states and the Renaissance and Reformation – as seen through the eyes of statesmen, philosophers, religious leaders, writers, artists, scientists, etc. of their day.

HIS*H102
Western Civilization II
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. Students may not receive credit for His*H104 or 122 in addition to His*H102. This course is an issue-oriented study of Western Civilization from 1715 to the present from a contemporary perspective. Topics, selected on the basis of significance and relevance, will include change through revolution and evolution, industrialization and class conflict, individualism and collectivism, nationalism and imperialism, war and peace, totalitarianism, and the ecumenical spirit – as seen through the eyes of statesmen, philosophers, religious leaders, writers, artists, scientists, etc. of their day.

HIS*H104
Milestones in Western Civilization
3 cr. Credits

Students may not receive credit for His*H101, 102, 105, or His*H122 in addition to His*H104. A one-semester course in Western Civilization. The course is issue-oriented and focuses on such topics as order and justice under law, the distribution of wealth and power, class structures and social mobility, church and state, the impact of inventions and technology, industrialization and urbanization, nationalism and imperialism, reform and/or revolution, the state and the individual, and war and peace.

HIS*H121
World Civilization I
3 cr. Credits

Students may not receive credit for His*H101 or 104 in addition to His*H121. A study and appreciation of African, European, and American civilizations, and their interaction with each other up to 1600.

HIS*H122
World Civilization II
3 cr. Credits

Students may not receive credit for His*H102 or 104 in addition to His*H122. A study and appreciation of African, European, and American civilizations, and the increasing interdependence from 1600 to the present.

HIS*H123
Contemporary Issues in World Civilization
3 cr. Credits

In-depth studies of some of the major problems that confront the world today are presented. Course content is likely to vary from one semester to another in order to keep up with the changing complexion of the world's problems.

HIS*H124
Women of the World
3 cr. Credits

This course is a study of women as driving forces in history and women driven by historical forces. Portraits of outstanding historical and contemporary female personalities – pagan priestesses and goddesses, women poets, scientists, educators, healers and reformers are presented.

HIS*H201
U.S. History I
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. This course is essentially a chronological treatment of the social, economic, political and cultural development of the American people to 1865. Certain topics such as colonial life, the Revolution, the political thought of Hamilton and Jefferson, reform, slavery, abolition, and the Civil War are studied in depth.

HIS*H202
U.S. History II
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. The course is essentially chronological in its treatment of the period from 1865 to the present. Certain topics in the social, economic, political, and cultural development of the American nation, such as the Age of Industrialization, International Relations and World War I, the Depression and New Deal, World War II and postwar period including the Cold War, the Eisenhower Era, the Sixties and Vietnam are studied in depth.

HIS*H210
History of Colonial America
3 cr. Credits

This course addresses the social, economic, political and cultural development of the people of the British North American Colonies to 1783. Topics covered in this course will include the Americas prior to European colonization, early European exploration and settlement in the Americas, relations between Great Britain and the American colonies, the background and causes for the American Revolution, the development and operation of the American national government, and development of an American society/culture.

HIS*H213
The United States Since World War II
3 cr. Credits

This course addresses the social, economic, political and cultural development of the United States between 1920 and the present. Topics covered in this course will include the culture and economy of the 1920s, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, American society in the 1950s, the Civil Rights Movement, the Women's Rights Movement, the war in Vietnam, the Counterculture of the 1960s and '70s, the Reagan and Bush eras, the end of the Cold War, and the Clinton era.

HIS*H215
History of Women in the US
3 cr. Credits

This course will examine the position of women in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topics of study will include the origins and issues of the women's movement in the nineteenth century, women's suffrage, the women's movement in the 1960's and 1970's, women and the law, women and patterns of work, women and business, women and religion, women and athletics, women and homemaking, women and assertiveness, women and sexuality, women and aging, women and divorce, and women and affirmative action.

HIS*H218
African-American History
3 cr. Credits

This course will utilize historical, sociological, and cultural perspectives in the analysis of the current status of African-Americans in the United States. The quest for equality, problems and prospects, and the role of African-Americans in the development of American and world cultures will be explored.