Delivered and Supported by the Arts & Humanities Division

English

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Why study English, you ask?

Language is at the heart of our humanity. It informs who we are, what we do and what we want our lives to be about.

Studying language gives you the opportunity to master the allied skills of thinking, reading and writing.

  • Courses in composition help you to manage the language.
  • Courses in literature encourage you to appreciate the full range of human expression, enhancing your engagement with words and the world.

These foci cultivate a deeper understanding of ourselves and others, foster a critical and creative engagement with language and literature, and allows teachers, scholars, writers and professionals to emerge as individuals capable of contending with the complexities of our world.

Earn an Associate Degree, Certificate or take a Course or two

Degree Programs

The requirements for the liberal arts degree allow you to transfer seamlessly to most four-year colleges and to successfully complete your bachelor's degree in communication without loss of credit or time. 

Associate of Arts Degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Courses


ENG*H063
Writing: Introduction to Essay
3 cr. Credits

Does not apply to degree. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on placement tests or recommendation of Division Director and instructor. This course will enhance the student's confidence in expressing ideas and provide practice with sound writing mechanics. Emphasis is placed on practicing the writing process with a focus on rhetorical methods; skills are taught within the context of essay writing. In addition, students will read, critically assess and write as a response to readings. Library and research techniques are practiced. This is a prerequisite for ENG*H101 unless placement exams indicate a readiness otherwise. ENG*H063 may not be taken concurrently with, or after completing, ENG*H101. This course requires a minimum of six (6) hours of outside work per week. This course does not fulfill any degree requirement.

ENG*H101
Composition
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: “C” or better in ENG*H063 or successful completion of placement tests or recommendation of Division Director and instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ENG*H053, or ENG*H063 or ENG*H102. This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of writing and to develop their critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. The class will focus on the writing of expository essays, often in response to complex readings. This course will emphasize the necessity of revision as a means of producing college-level writing. Intensive library and research techniques are an integral part of this course.

ENG*H102
Literature and Composition
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: “C” or better in ENG*H101 or recommendation of Division Director and instructor. Students develop skills in understanding and appreciating genres such as fiction, poetry, and drama. Additionally, students apply critical methodologies and investigate relationships between literature and society, thus confirming their skills of analysis and writing. Intensive library and research techniques are an integral part of this course. ENG*H102 is an academic core course.

ENG*H200
Advanced Composition
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG*H101 or recommendation of Division Director and instructor. Students will study audiences, research, and write material for those audiences. Students will be encouraged to freelance some writing during the semester.

ENG*H202
Technical Writing
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H101. This course involves the student in the study and practice of the basic skills and principles of technical writing for business and industry. The practice of writing is emphasized; graphic and design elements including designing visual formats are given secondary emphasis. The course focuses on the fundamental skills and formats of letter/memos, instructions, proposals, reports, and layperson writing (communicating difficult subjects to general audiences). Individual instructors may add other subjects.

ENG*H214
Dramatic Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG *H102 or ENG*H200. The study of dramatic literature, analysis and critical writings about the great plays from the canon of world drama. Works to be read include plays by Euripedes, Shakespeare, Molière, Isben, Chekhov, Williams, and Hansberry.

ENG*H215
Studies in Children's Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisites: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course covers selection, evaluation and critical study of books and materials available for children. Included are folklore, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, as well as discussion of outstanding writers and illustrators, past and present.

ENG*H221
American Literature I
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisites: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. Students read and discuss leading writers of America to the Civil War. Included are works of the Puritans, Jefferson, Franklin, Cooper, Emerson, Melville, and Whitman. Critical and historical analysis is included. The period covered by this course corresponds to the period covered by His*H201, U.S. History I.

ENG*H222
American Literature II
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisites: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. Students read and discuss leading writers of America from 1865 through World War II. Critical and historical analysis is included. The period covered by this course corresponds to His*H202, U.S. History II. Authors such as Twain, James, Crane, Frost, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner are included.

ENG*H231
British Literature I
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisites: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. Students read and discuss representative writers of British poetry and prose to the eighteenth century including the works of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, and Johnson. Course offering subject to enrollment.

ENG*H232
British Literature II
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisites: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. Students make an intensive critical and historical study of British writers beginning with Blake and the Romantics and ending with twentieth century writers. Offered subject to enrollment.

ENG*H241
World Literature I
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course is a study of representative works of world literature to 1715. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions.

ENG*H251
African-American Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This survey of African-American literature will analyze and discuss the Black experience through literature. It will begin with the eighteenth century and continue to the present. Because this body of work is of great social import, and because there are several “Black Experiences,” a generous selection of works will be included.

ENG*H252
African-American Drama
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course is a survey of African-American drama. It analyzes and discusses African-American and other diverse theatrical experiences through the study of dramatic presentation.

ENG*H278
Contemporary Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course critically analyzes post-WWII literature, including short fiction, poetry, and drama. This course will include discussions of literatures from around the world as well as new developments in literary studies, such as post-Colonialism and postmodernism.

ENG*H281
Creative Writing
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H101. This course gives students practical experience in writing various forms of prose and verse. The emphasis will be on individual creative methods, creative reading and listening, editorial techniques, and the production of finished work, including possible preparation of manuscripts for publication.

ENG*H211
Short Story
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course is a study of the framework and the major movements, writers and works of short fiction. Emphasis is given to the various attempts to portray the response to the complexity of life and to examine the role of literature. It will, further, focus on the study of short prose fiction in order to develop the ability to read and write. The course informs understanding of how literary form suits both an author's and an age's aesthetic.

ENG*H60
Studies in Women's Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course is a study of the representative works by women from historical, social, and literary perspectives and examines the literary impact of gendered identies. Emphasis is given to how gender roles develop and change and how women's views of themselves are reflected in their writing. From tracing the development of this literature, the class will consider the historical, philosophical, religious, and cultural perspectives that allow us to delve into the writing of major women writers. This course will focus primarily on Western writers, though not exclusively, from the Renaissance to the present.

ENG*H269
Studies in Young Adult Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course covers selection, evaluation, and critical study of fiction available for adolescents and young adults (ages 12-18). Students will learn about the young adult novel as a literary form with an emphasis on reading of representative fiction. The course will also include the history of the genre and interpretive approaches to texts, the exploration of common themes, as well as the opportunity to write young adult fiction.

ENG*H274
The Graphic Novel as Literature
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102. Student explores the use of the combination of words and graphic images to create effective storytelling. Both contemporary and historic examples of graphic novels will be examined.

ENG*H277
Science Fiction & Society
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. In this course, students will develop skills in understanding and appreciating the genre of science fiction and its relation to other literary genres. Additionally, students will apply critical methodologies and investigate relationships between science fiction and society, thus confirming their skills of analysis and writing. Particular approaches to science fiction will involve Marxist, feminist, gender, psychoanalytical, and anthropological critical theories. Anthropological critical theory will include colonialism and social identity (i.e., ethnocentrism, folk idea about the Other).