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Chemistry

The field of chemistry is a central discipline in the understanding of natural phenomena and the creation of products useful to humanity. Chemists are at the forefront of exciting research in medicine and environmental technologies, such as fuel cells. It is because of this key role in emerging research that the employment prospects for chemists in the coming years are good. Students interested in immersing themselves in challenging problems at the forefront of science should consider majoring in chemistry.

Earn an Associate Degree, Certificate or take a Course or two

Degree Programs

The requirements for the following degrees allow you to transfer seamlessly to most four-year colleges and to successfully complete your bachelor's degree in chemistry without loss of credit or time.

Associate of Arts Degree in Mathematics/Science
Associate of Arts Degree in Mathematics/Science: Chemistry Option
Associate of Arts Degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences
Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies

Courses


CHE*H111
Concepts of Chemistry
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: MAT*H137. Lecture-laboratory. This is a foundation course designed to present chemical concepts including the metric system, scientific measurements, atomic theory, chemical bonding, periodic variation of the elements, nomenclature, equations, gas laws, stoichiometry, basic types of chemical reactions, and a brief survey of organic chemistry. This course is open to students with little or no background in chemistry. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly.

CHE*H121
General Chemistry I
4 cr. Credits

Coerequisite: MAT*H172, its equivalent or permission of instructor. Lecture-laboratory. The fundamental concepts and laws of chemistry are examined. Topics covered include atomic theory, chemical bonding, periodic table and periodic law, nomenclature, states of matter, solutions, stoichiometry, acid-base theory, oxidation, reduction, and coordination chemistry. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly.

CHE*H122
General Chemistry II
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: completion of Che*H121 with a grade of “C” or better. Lecture-laboratory. This course provides a more specific discussion of major topics within the four major divisions of chemistry. Topics covered include colloids, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electro-chemistry, discussion of physical and chemical properties of selected groups on the periodic table, ionic equilibria of weak electrolytes, buffer solutions and titration curves, solubility product, qualitative analysis, and a brief introduction to organic chemistry. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly.

CHE*H211
Organic Chemistry I
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Che*H121-122 or acceptable one-year college chemistry course at another institution. Lecture-laboratory. This is a fundamental course involving systematic study of the reactions of organic compounds, the relationships between molecular structure and reactivity, and an introduction into spectroscopic analysis. The laboratory has been revised to include the ultra modern microscale technique. This approach includes some of the following advantages: elimination of fire or explosion danger, elimination of chemical waste disposal problems, expansion in variety and sophistication of experiments, and creation of a much healthier laboratory environment. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly.

CHE*H212
Organic Chemistry II
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: CHE*H211. Lecture-laboratory. This course is a continuation of Che*H211, dealing with more complex classes of carbon compounds including sugars, amino acids and proteins, heterocyclics, and polymers. The laboratory has been revised to include the ultra modern microscale technique. This approach includes some of the following advantages: elimination of fire or explosion danger, elimination of chemical waste disposal problems, expansion in variety and sophistication of experiments, and creation of a much healthier laboratory environment. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly.