Delivered and Supported by the Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Biological Sciences

Whether you desire a rigorous background for a degree in the sciences, a foundation for healthcare careers or an excellent liberal arts education, our biology courses provide you with opportunities to learn in a student-centered environment.

You'll get hands-on laboratory and field experiences using investigation methods and experimental techniques that reflect the current state of biological science.

Earn an Associate Degree, Certificate or take a Course or two

Degree Programs

The requirements for the following programs allow you to transfer seamlessly to most four-year colleges and to successfully complete your bachelor's degree in biology without loss of credit or time.

Associate of Science Degree in Environmental Science: Biology
Associate of Arts Degree in Mathematics/Science
Associate of Arts Degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Courses


BIO*H105
Introduction to Biology
4 cr. Credits

The general principles of biology are taught using a combination of multimedia lectures, discussion groups, and a laboratory component. Topics covered include cell biology, diversity, biotechnology, basic chemistry, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, ecology, genetics, behavior, and evolution. Laboratory includes an animal dissection. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H110
Principles of the Human Body
3 cr. Credits

Open to students needing a three-credit science course in their program of study including Liberal Arts and Sciences and General Studies. This course is an introduction and survey of human anatomy and function including the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, immunological, urinary, nervous, sensory, muscular, skeletal, endocrine, and reproductive systems of the body. The course will include discussions of the evolution of the human body and its dynamic interaction with the Environment. Not open for credit to students who have passed any higher-numbered anatomy and physiology course.

BIO*H111
Introduction to Nutrition
3 cr. Credits

A basic introduction to the science of nutrition with an emphasis on making healthy food and lifestyle choices. Health and disease, metabolism, cultural diversity and food processing are studied in relationship to individual nutrients as well as to total dietary patterns. Information presented enables analysis and modification of diets to promote health, reduce the risk of deficiencies and chronic diseases related to nutrition and evaluate dietary advertising, controversies and nutritional policies.

BIO*H115
Human Biology & Lab
4 cr. Credits

Students may not receive credit for both BIO*H110 and BIO*H115. This introductory course will focus on the overarching themes of health, homeostasis, evolution and the environment as they relate to human body systems. Laboratory experiments include microscopic examination of cells and tissues, anatomy, physiology of nerves and muscles, blood typing, and principles of inheritance. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H121
General Biology I - Cellular Biology
4 cr. Credits

The general principles of biology are taught integrating lectures, laboratory experiments, computer simulations, discussions, and other activities to help students gain an understanding of the essential biological concepts. The foci of this course are scientific method, cell biology, viruses, prokaryotic organisms, protists, basic cell chemistry, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, mitosis & meiosis, genetics, and biotechnology (plant tissue culture, genetic transformation). Cooperative learning, critical thinking, library research, as well as presentation skills are utilized culminating in a team project that includes a written paper and a short presentation. This course is one part of a two semester sequence in general biology primarily for students seeking transfer into a four-year degree program. BIO*H121 (Cellular Biology) and H122 (Organismal Biology) can be taken in any order and are transferable. This course satisfies the common core science requirement. Integrated 3 hours lecture & 3 hours lab.

BIO*H122
General Biology II - Organismal Biology
4 cr. Credits

Utilizing the same integrative approach as BIO*H121, students will investigate biotechnology (gel electrophoresis for DNA and protein analysis), systematics, biological statistics, population genetics, evolution, plant biology (life-cycles and growth of fungi, non-vascular, and vascular plants), animal biology (early development and histology, comparison of invertebrate and vertebrate life cycles and physiological systems), and ecology. Science process skills are emphasized. Collaboratively, students will investigate a scientific research topic culminating in a written report and oral presentation to their peers. This course is one part of a two semester sequence in general biology primarily for students seeking transfer into a four-year degree program. This is the second semester of general biology; however, BIO*H121 (Cellular Biology) and H122 (Organismal Biology) can be taken in any order. This course satisfies the common core science requirement for both non-majors & majors. Integrated 3 hours lecture & 3 hours lab.

BIO*H145
General Zoology
4 cr. Credits

This lecture-laboratory is a survey of the animal kingdom. Topics discussed include morphology, anatomy and physiology, life cycles, reproduction, evolution, and ecological relationships of various animal forms. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H155
General Botany
4 cr. Credits

The focus of this course is how plants function. It is an introduction to plant physiology and development, explaining growth processes, metabolism and hormonal responses. Additional topics, such as soils, plant breeding, and propagation will be addressed. The laboratory component is designed to involve students with important concepts discussed in lecture. Integrated 3 hours lecture & 3 hours lab.

BIO*H171
Field Biology
4 cr. Credits

Lecture-laboratory. This is an introduction to ecology with special emphasis on identification of Connecticut plants and animals in the outdoors. A wide range of topics will be presented including map reading, edible wild foods, and collecting. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly

BIO*H180
Principles of Environmental Science
3 cr. Credits

This is a survey course of Environmental studies. Topics discussed include basic ecology; human populations; water, soil, forests and pollution; renewable and non-renewable energy; legislation; citizens action. Dynamic Environmental systems are explored via computer simulations.

BIO*H181
Environmental Science & Lab
4 cr. Credits

Note: Students may not receive credit for both Bio*H180 and Bio*H181. This course has the same lecture as Bio*H180; however, there is an additional laboratory component. Laboratory experiences include water and soil analyses, pond and river studies, computer simulations, field trips to Environmental quality facilities and laboratories. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H211
Anatomy and Physiology I
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Completion of Bio*H105, BIO*H115 or BIO*H121 with a grade of “C” or better or by permission of the Division Director. Lecture-laboratory. This is the first semester of a two semester comprehensive course designed for those students who plan to continue in the science field or science-related areas. Major topic areas include molecular biology, cells, tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems of the human body. Laboratory includes an animal dissection. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H212
Anatomy and Physiology II
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Completion of Bio*H211 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the Division Director. Lecture-laboratory. Major topic areas include the cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive systems of the human body. Laboratory includes an animal dissection. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H225
Introduction to Biotechnology
4 cr. Credits

This course studies the fundamental concepts underpinning the expanding field of biotechnology with an emphasis on agricultural and environmental applications. It is a hands-on course where students will actively investigate essential cell biology, plant tissue culture, genetics, population genetics, fermentation-microbial food production, genetically modified crops, gel electrophoresis, allergic immune response, as well as agricultural, ecological, and societal issues. Computer simulations, student presentations, and field trips are also used to facilitate active learning. This course will satisfy a science laboratory core curriculum requirement. Three (3) hours of lecture and three (3) hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H227
Biotechnology II
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisites: Completion of Bio*H225 and BIO*H235 or permission of instructor. This course builds on principles and practices learned in Introduction to Biotechnology (BIO*H225) and Microbiology (BIO*H235). Students will develop an understanding of the theoretical basis of this technology as well as develop laboratory skills, through hands-on experiences, that are essential for employment in biotechnology. With an emphasis on molecular biology, students will investigate the following areas of biotechnology: animal cell culture, genetic transformation, DNA isolation, restriction digests including DNA fingerprinting, plasmid transformation, PCR amplification, DNA sequencing, southern blot analysis, and separation technology. Three (3) hours of lecture and three (3) hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H235
Microbiology
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Bio*H105, or H115 or H155 or H121, or H225, or permission of the Division Director. This course introduces the student to bacteria and other microorganisms. Particular emphasis is placed on the biology of bacteria and bacterial diseases. Fungi, viruses, protozoans are also studied. Immunology, microbial genetics and biotechnology are discussed. The emphasis in the laboratory is on the identification, safe handling and cultivation of microbes. Activities include staining techniques, identification of unknowns, electrophoresis, computer simulations and growth experiments with comparative analysis of results. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.

BIO*H260
Principles of Genetics
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Bio*H105 or equivalent. This is an introduction to the principles of genetics. It covers Mendelian analysis, chromosome theory, extensions of Mendelian analysis, molecular genetics, as well as quantitative and population genetics.

BIO*H262
Genetics & Lab
4 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Bio*H105 or equivalent. Credit cannot be given for both Bio*H260 and Bio*H262. Same lecture as Bio*H260 but with a laboratory component. The laboratory investigations include experiments with Drosophila and bacteria. Computer simulations, bacterial transformations, and gel electrophoresis are also carried out. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory weekly.