Delivered and Supported by the Behavioral and Social Sciences Division

Anthropology and Archaeology

  • What are humans?
  • Where do you, as humans, come from, both biologically and geographically?
  • How does where you come from affect how you think, what you believe and how you act? 
  • Why are people in different places so different? And in what ways people are all the same? 

In anthropology courses at NVCC, you will learn the answers to these questions and more. You'll also get more than theory - you can “get your hands dirty” at the college’s on-campus archaeological site.

Earn an Associate Degree, Certificate or take a Course or two

Degree Programs

The requirements for the following degrees allow you to transfer seamlessly to most four-year colleges and to successfully complete your bachelor's degree in anthropology without loss of credit or time.

Associate of Science Degree in Behavioral Science
Associate of Arts Degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Courses


ANT*H101
Introduction to Anthropology
3 cr. Credits

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. This course is an introduction to physical and cultural anthropology. Topics include a study of genetics and evolution, the origins of man and the development of culture, human variation and race, archaeology, language and communication, marriage and family patterns, kinship and descent, religion, the arts, economic and political organization, personality and culture, and cultural change.

ANT*H105
Cultural Anthropology
3 cr. Credits

This course is an examination of the concept of culture as the central mode through which humans become people. Students will examine the concept of culture vs. instinct, human cultural adaptation and variation, along with cultural universals, language and communication, marriage and family patterns, kinship and descent, religion, the arts, economic and political organization, personality and culture, and cultural change.

ANT*H121
Introduction to Archaeology
3 cr. Credits

Archaeology is the study of past cultures and societies through examination of their material remains. The class will explore different varieties of archaeology and examine theory, methods, and techniques for investigating, reconstructing, interpreting, preserving, and ultimately, learning from the past. Students will then briefly review human cultural chronology from the time of the first people, the earliest Paleolithic ages, to the present, and deal with not only the artifact remains but also important social, economic, and even ideological questions, such as those on the origins of food production, social inequality, and civilization. Two major emphases throughout the course are archaeology as anthropology and the relevance of archaeology to modern human society and politics. The class will also examine discoveries that make the news during the semester.