Criminal Justice/Public Safety

Associates of Science

There continues to be a need for professional public servants. The modern criminal justice/public safety system needs people with the ability to think critically, demonstrate sensitivity, and maintain professional standards. Enroll in our criminal justice courses or get your degree and explore the possibilities for a career in this field.  

Our Criminal Justice/Public Safety program can help prepare you for entry-level employment or give you the education you need to transfer to a four-year college or university.

Get your degree in criminal justice and specialize in: law enforcement, corrections, computer crime deterrence, security and forensics.

Choosing one of these options will require the completion of specific courses related to that particular field of study. Placement testing will determine the sequencing of courses. Additional courses may be required.

Criminal Justice/Public Safety A.S. - Requirements & Outcomes


Competency or
Program Requirement
Course Number and Title Required
Credits
Aesthetic Dimensions/Written Communications Choose any Aesthetic Dimensions/Written Communications listed 3
Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics Choose any Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics listed 3
Critical Analysis and Logical Thinking/Written Communication ENG*101 Composition 3
Historical Knowledge Choose any Historical Knowledge listed 3
Oral Communication COM*100 Introduction to Communications or COM*173 Public Speaking 3
Quantitative Reasoning MAT*167 Principles of Statistics 3
Scientific Knowledge BIO*105 Introduction to Biology 4
Scientific Reasoning DAR*158 Biology of Addiction 3
Social Phenomena SOC*101 Principles of Sociology 3
Written Communication ENG102 Literature and Composition 3
Program Requirements CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H102 Introduction to Corrections 3
CJS*H103 Introduction to Security 3
CJS*H105 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3
CJS*H211 Criminal Law 3
CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
CJS*H220 Criminal Investigation 3
CJS*H293 Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience†† 3
SOC*H240 Criminology 3
CJS*H210 Constitutional Law 3
Total Credits: 61-62

Notes:

Any given course may only be used to satisfy one of the competency areas even if it is listed under more than one.

Students planning to transfer to a 4-year school should plan to complete MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics or MAT*H172 College Algebra.

††Placement is required. Students need to contact the program coordinator or the LABSS division office early in the semester prior to taking the course.

At least one Scientific Knowledge and Understanding OR Scientific Reasoning course must have a lab component.

Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  1. Given a set of circumstances and occurrences, present a well written investigative report and any accompanying documents.
  2. Explain the basic structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Explain the structure of the Federal and State court systems.
  4. Identify the functions and services of private security.
  5. Explain the computer crime problem.
  6. Explain the development of probation, parole and community supervision.
  7. Explain the development of the corrections system in the United States.
  8. Explain what effects the social conditions in the United States have upon the criminal justice system.
  9. Read and explain relevant literature in the field of Criminal Justice.
  10. Demonstrate the various methods of taking written statements and confessions.
  11. Define the term investigation and the objectives of a criminal investigation.
  12. State the psychological theories that may explain criminal behavior.
  13. Identify the major sociological theories of criminal behavior.
  14. Describe and evaluate the ways in which data are collected on crimes, criminals, and victims.
  15. Present oral reports before a group.
  16. Explain some of the basic issues and problems in policing, the courts, and corrections in America today.
  17. Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments.
  18. Explain the contributions of both the classical and positivist schools of criminology.
  19. Show how events in early American history influenced the development of the American Criminal Justice System.
  20. Explain what bearing state and local political issues have on the Criminal Justice System.
  21. Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  22. Define and explain the elements which identify the offenses of: assault, sex crimes, burglary, arson, larceny, robbery and homicide.
  23. Explain how state and local law enforcement agencies originated in the United States and how they currently function.
  24. Identify the areas that establish a police officer’s authority for arrest.
  25. Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  26. Integrate the theoretical and practical application of the Criminal Justice Program.

Computer Crime Deterrence Option - Requirements & Outcomes


Course Type Course Number & Title Cr.
Core Communications COM*H100 Introduction to Communications 3
Core Communications ENG*H101 Composition 3
Core Humanities ENG*H102 Literature and Composition 3
     
Core Mathematics MAT*H135 Topics in Contemporary Mathematics or higher (except MAT*H137) 3
     
Core Science BIO*H105 Introduction to Biology or
BIO*H115 Human Biology or
PHY*H110 Introduction to Physics
4
     
Core Behavioral Science SOC*H101 Principles of Sociology 3
Program Behavioral Science SOC*H240 Criminology 3
Program Behavioral Science Any Sociology (SOC) course 3
Program Behavioral Science PSY*H111 General Psychology I 3
     
Core Social Science HIS*H201 U.S. History I or
POL*H112 State & Local Government
3
     
Core Arts or Humanities PHL*H111 Ethics 3
     
Program Business CSC*H101 Introduction to Computers 3
Program Business CST*H120 Introduction to Operating Systems 3
     
Program Requirement CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
Program Requirement CJS*H211 Criminal Law I 3
Program Requirement CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
Program Requirement CJS*H224 Computer Crimes 3
Program Requirement CJS*H234 Computer Security & Data Protection 3
Program Requirement CJS*H235 Information Warfare & Security 3
Program Requirement CJS*H293 Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience†† 3
Total Credits: 61

Notes:

Students planning to transfer to a 4-year school should plan to complete MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics or MAT*H172 College Algebra.

††Placement is required. Students need to contact the program coordinator or the LABSS division office early in the semester prior to taking the course.

Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  1. Given a set of circumstances and occurrences, present a well written investigative report and any other accompanying documents.
  2. Explain the basic structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Understand the growing dependence and reliance on personal computers in our society.
  4. Understand the uses of database management software and its applicability to the business environment.
  5. Identify a variety of Network Operating System Software and the features and functionality each provides.
  6. Discuss the various problems encountered in the area of information security.
  7. Identify current strategies used to protect data.
  8. List and describe some of the more common viruses that have infected computer systems.
  9. Develop security measures to neutralize various threats and risks.
  10. Describe several forms of computer hacking.
  11. Explain the purpose and use of the memory management software.
  12. Explain various Network Operating Systems (NOS) used in Local Area Networks (LANS).
  13. Identify the major sociological theories of criminal behavior.
  14. Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eight and Fourteenth Amendments.
  15. Explain the contributions of both the classical and positivist schools of criminology.
  16. Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  17. Identify methods used to safeguard information.
  18. Discuss the legal issues affecting the recovery of evidence during investigations involving the Internet.
  19. List and describe the civil liability issues associated with Internet investigations.
  20. Explain the investigative process as it relates to computer crime.
  21. Explain the problem of establishing a crime scene for a computer crime.
  22. Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  23. Discuss the concepts of offensive and defensive information warfare.
  24. Describe the various information warfare technologies.
  25. Explain how information warfare helped to win the Gulf War.
  26. Explain how information can be pirated and what can be done about it.

Corrections Option - Requirements & Outcomes

Course Type Course Number & Title Cr.
Aesthetic Dimensions/Written Communications Choose any Aesthetic Dimensions/ Written Communications listed 3
Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics Choose any Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics listed 3
Critical Analysis and Logical Thinking/ Written Communication ENG*H101 Composition 3
Historical Knowledge Choose any Historical Knowledge listed 3
Oral Communication COM*H100 Introduction to Communications or COM*173 Public Speaking 3
Quantitative Reasoning MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics† 3
Scientific Knowledge◊ BIO*H105 Introduction to Biology 4
Scientific Reasoning◊ DAR*H158 Biology of Addiction 3
Social Phenomena SOC*H101 Principles of Sociology 3
Written Communication ENG*H102 Literature and Composition 3
Program Requirements CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H102 Introduction to Corrections 3
CJS*H261 Victim and Offender Mediation 3
CJS*H246 Juvenile Corrections 3
CJS*H211 Criminal Law I 3
CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
CJS*H241 Correctional Counseling I 3
CJS*H293 Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience†† 3
SOC*H240 Criminology 3
CJS*H244 Community Based Corrections 3

Notes:

Any given course may only be used to satisfy one of the competency areas even if it is listed under more than one.

†Students planning to transfer to a 4-year school should plan to complete MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics or MAT*H172 College Algebra.

††Placement is required. Students need to contact the program coordinator or the LABSS division office early in the semester prior to taking the course.

◊ At least one Scientific Knowledge and Understanding OR Scientific Reasoning course must have a lab component.


Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  1. Present a well written investigative report and any other accompanying documents when given a set of circumstances and occurrences.
  2. Explain the basic structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Explain the structure of the federal and state court systems.
  4. Explain the development of probation, parole and community supervision.
  5. Explain the development of the correctional system in the United States.
  6. Explain the role of the victim in rehabilitating the offender.
  7. Identify methods used to manage conflict.
  8. Explain what effects the social conditions in the United States have upon the criminal justice system.
  9. Read and explain relevant literature in the field of criminal justice.
  10. Explain the development of the juvenile corrections system.
  11. Explain the specific problems of juveniles in the criminal justice system.
  12. State the psychological theories that may explain criminal behavior.
  13. Identify the major sociological theories of criminal behavior.
  14. Describe and evaluate the ways in which data are collected on crimes, criminals and victims.
  15. Present oral reports before a group.
  16. Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments.
  17. Explain some of the basic issues and problems in policing, the courts, and corrections in America today.
  18. Explain the contributions of both the classical and positivist schools of criminology.
  19. Show how events from early American history influenced the development of the American Criminal Justice System.
  20. Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  21. Define and explain the element of: assault, sex crimes, burglary, arson, larceny, robbery and homicide.
  22. List the various forms of intervention techniques available in corrections.
  23. Explain how correctional counseling works.
  24. Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  25. Integrate the theoretical and practical applications of the Criminal Justice Program.
  26. List alternatives to incarceration that are now in use.
  27. Explain the concept of community corrections.

Forensics Option - Requirements & Outcomes

Course Type Course Number & Title Cr.
Aesthetic Dimensions/Written Communications Choose any Aesthetic Dimensions/ Written Communications listed 3
Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics Choose any Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics listed 3
Critical Analysis and Logical Thinking/ Written Communication ENG*101 Composition 3
Historical Knowledge Choose any Historical Knowledge listed 3
Oral Communication COM*100 Introduction to Communications or COM*173 Public Speaking 3
Quantitative Reasoning MAT*167 Principles of Statistics† 3
Scientific Knowledge◊ BIO*105 Introduction to Biology 4
Scientific Reasoning◊ DAR*158 Biology of Addiction 3
Social Phenomena SOC*101 Principles of Sociology 3
Written Communication ENG102 Literature and Composition 3
Program Requirements CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJS*225 Forensic Science 3
CJS*H229 Crime Scene Investigation 3
CJS*H105 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3
CJS*H211 Criminal Law 3
CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
CJS*H255 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H293 Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience†† 3
SOC*H240 Criminology 3
Criminal Justice Directed Elective 3

Notes:

Any given course may only be used to satisfy one of the competency areas even if it is listed under more than one.

†Students planning to transfer to a 4-year school should plan to complete MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics or MAT*H172 College Algebra.

††Placement is required. Students need to contact the program coordinator or the LABSS division office early in the semester prior to taking the course.

◊ At least one Scientific Knowledge and Understanding OR Scientific Reasoning course must have a lab component.


Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  1. Given a set of circumstances and occurrences, present a well written investigative report and any other accompanying documents.
  2. Explain the basic structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Explain the structure of the Federal and State court systems.
  4. Manage a crime scene.
  5. Recognize evidence at a crime scene.
  6. Collect, preserve and package evidence.
  7. Mark and record evidence.
  8. Discuss the capabilities of the crime lab.
  9. Explain the concept of transfer of evidence.
  10. Conduct basic laboratory analysis.
  11. Conduct field tests.
  12. Identify and describe a crime scene.
  13. Discuss the capabilities of various pieces of equipment used at a crime scene.
  14. Conduct a crime scene search.
  15. Name the types of evidence
  16. Describe the "linkage triangle" for physical evidence.
  17. Explain what effects the social conditions in the United States have upon the criminal justice system.
  18. Read and explain relevant literature in the field of Criminal Justice.
  19. List the major categories of physical evidence.
  20. Explain the difference between class and individual characteristics of physical evidence.
  21. Explain the legal requirements effecting the crime scene.
  22. Explain the concept of chain of custody.
  23. Explain the scientific requirements effecting the crime scene.
  24. Explain the responsibilities of the first responder at the crime scene.
  25. State the psychological theories that may explain criminal behavior.
  26. Identify the major sociological theories of criminal behavior.
  27. Describe and evaluate the ways in which data are collected on crimes criminals and victims.
  28. Present oral reports before a group.
  29. Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eight and Fourteenth Amendments.
  30. Explain some of the basic issues and problems in policing, the courts, and corrections in America today.
  31. Explain what bearing state and local political issues have on the criminal justice system.
  32. Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  33. Define and explain the elements of: assault, sex crimes, burglary, arson, larceny, robbery and homicide.
  34. Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  35. Integrate the theoretical and practical application of the Criminal Justice Program.
  36. Explain the impact of the development of ethical thought on the Criminal Justice System.

Law Enforcement Option - Requirements & Outcomes

Course Type Course Number & Title Cr.
Aesthetic Dimensions/Written Communications Choose any Aesthetic Dimensions/ Written Communications listed 3
Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics Choose any Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics listed 3
Critical Analysis and Logical Thinking/ Written Communication ENG*101 Composition 3
Historical Knowledge Choose any Historical Knowledge listed 3
Oral Communication COM*100 Introduction to Communications or COM*173 Public Speaking 3
Quantitative Reasoning MAT*167 Principles of Statistics† 3
Scientific Knowledge◊ BIO*105 Introduction to Biology 4
Scientific Reasoning◊ DAR*158 Biology of Addiction 3
Social Phenomena SOC*101 Principles of Sociology 3
Written Communication ENG102 Literature and Composition 3
Program Requirements CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H210 Constitutional Law 3
CJS*220 Criminal Investigation 3
CJS*H105 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3
CJS*H211 Criminal Law I 3
CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
CJS*H255 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H293 Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience†† 3
SOC*H240 Criminology 3
CJS*H280 Victimology 3

Notes:

Any given course may only be used to satisfy one of the competency areas even if it is listed under more than one.

Students planning to transfer to a 4-year school should plan to complete MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics or MAT*H172 College Algebra.

††Placement is required. Students need to contact the program coordinator or the LABSS division office early in the semester prior to taking the course.

◊ At least one Scientific Knowledge and Understanding OR Scientific Reasoning course must have a lab component.


Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  1. Present a well written investigative report and any other accompanying documents when given a set of circumstances and occurrences.
  2. Explain the basic criminal justice structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Explain the structure of the federal and state court systems.
  4. Explain how state and local law enforcement agencies originated in the United States and how they currently function.
  5. Identify the areas that establish a police officer’s authority to arrest.
  6. Explain the concept of victim’s rights.
  7. Explain how a criminal selects a victim.
  8. Explain what effects the social conditions in the United States have upon the criminal justice system.
  9. Read and explain relevant literature in the field of criminal justice.
  10. Demonstrate the various investigation methods of taking written statements and confessions.
  11. Define the term investigation and the objectives of a criminal investigation.
  12. State the psychological theories that may explain criminal behavior.
  13. Identify the major sociological theories of criminal behavior.
  14. Describe and evaluate the ways in which data are collected on crimes, criminals and victims.
  15. Present oral reports before a group.
  16. Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments.
  17. Explain some of the basic issues and problems in policing, the courts, and corrections in America today.
  18. Explain the contributions of both the classical and positivist schools of criminology.
  19. Show how events from early American history influenced the development of the American Criminal Justice System.
  20. Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  21. Define and explain the elements of: assault, sex crimes, burglary, arson, larceny, robbery and homicide.
  22. List and explain the constitutional law relevant to Supreme Court cases regarding search and seizure.
  23. List and explain the Miranda Warnings.
  24. Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  25. Integrate the theoretical and practical application of the Criminal Justice Program.
  26. Explain the corruption hazards faced by law enforcement officers.
  27. Recite and explain the Law Enforcement Officers’ Code of Ethics.

Security Option - Requirements & Outcomes

Course Type Course Number & Title Cr.
Aesthetic Dimensions/Written Communications Choose any Aesthetic Dimensions/ Written Communications listed 3
Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics Choose any Continuing Learning and Information Literacy/Ethics listed 3
Critical Analysis and Logical Thinking/ Written Communication ENG*H101 Composition 3
Historical Knowledge Choose any Historical Knowledge listed 3
Oral Communication COM*H100 Introduction to Communications or COM*173 Public Speaking 3
Quantitative Reasoning MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics† 3
Scientific Knowledge◊ BIO*H105 Introduction to Biology 4
Scientific Reasoning◊ DAR*H158 Biology of Addiction 3
Social Phenomena SOC*H101 Principles of Sociology 3
Written Communication ENG*H102 Literature and Composition 3
Program Requirements CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H218 Legal Aspects of Security 3
CJS*103 Introduction to Security 3
CJS*H230 Security Management 3
CJS*H211 Criminal Law I 3
CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
CJS*H232 Industrial and
Retail Security
3
CJS*H293 Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience†† 3
SOC*H240 Criminology 3
CJS*H233 Institutional Security 3

Notes:

Any given course may only be used to satisfy one of the competency areas even if it is listed under more than one.

†Students planning to transfer to a 4-year school should plan to complete MAT*H167 Principles of Statistics or MAT*H172 College Algebra.

††Placement is required. Students need to contact the program coordinator or the LABSS division office early in the semester prior to taking the course.

◊ At least one Scientific Knowledge and Understanding OR Scientific Reasoning course must have a lab component.


Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  1. Present a well written investigative report and any other accompanying documents when given a set of circumstances and occurrences.
  2. Explain the basic structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Explain the structure of the federal and state court systems.
  4. Identify the functions and services of private security.
  5. Explain the computer crime problem.
  6. Explain how institutional security may differ from other types of security.
  7. Explain the various security systems in use in institutional establishments.
  8. Read and explain relevant literature in the field of criminal justice.
  9. Explain the problems of theft from industrial and retail establishments.
  10. Explain the various security systems in use in industrial and retail establishments.
  11. State the psychological theories that may explain criminal behavior.
  12. Identify the major sociological theories of criminal behavior.
  13. Describe and evaluate the ways in which data are collected on crimes, criminals and victims.
  14. Present oral reports before a group.
  15. Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments.
  16. Explain some of the basic issues and problems in policing, the courts, and corrections in America today.
  17. Explain the contributions of both the classical and positivist schools of criminology.
  18. Show how events from early American history influenced the development of the American Criminal Justice System.
  19. Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  20. Define and explain the elements of: assault, sex crimes, burglary, arson, larceny, robbery and homicide.
  21. List and explain some of the legal problems that may be encountered in the field of security.
  22. Explain the problem of liability as it applies to the field of security.
  23. Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  24. Integrate the theoretical and practical application of the Criminal Justice Program.
  25. Explain the legal problems encountered in security management and supervision.
  26. Explain the supervision practices used in the security field.

Certificate Requirements

Course No. Title Credits
CJS*H101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJS*H102 Introduction to Corrections 3
CJS*H103 Introduction to Security 3
CJS*H105 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3
CJS*H211 Criminal Law I 3
CJS*H217 American Legal Systems 3
CJS*H220 Criminal Investigation 3
CJS*H293 CJS Cooperative Work Experience 3
  Total Credit Hours 24

Certificate Outcomes - What you will learn

Upon successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will be able to:

  • Explain the basic structure and functions of the American Criminal Justice System.
  • Explain the structure of the federal and state court systems.
  • Identify the functions and services of private security.
  • Explain the computer crime problem.
  • Explain the development of probation, parole and community supervision.
  • Explain the development of the corrections system in the United States.
  • Demonstrate the various methods of taking written statements and confessions.
  • Define the term investigation and the objectives of a criminal investigation.
  • Explain some of the basic issues and problems in policing, the courts, and corrections in America today.
  • Explain the Bill of Rights and those specific rights guaranteed by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments.
  • Explain the concept of criminal law, including its purpose as an agent of social control.
  • Define and explain the elements which identify the offenses of assault, sex crimes, burglary, arson, larceny, robbery and homicide.
  • Explain how state and local law enforcement agencies originated in the United States and how they currently function.
  • Identify the areas that establish a police officer’s authority to arrest.
  • Demonstrate work skills relevant to a criminal justice agency.
  • Integrate the theoretical and practical application of the Criminal Justice Program.

The following list of courses are specifically related to the Criminal Justice/Public Safety 'Subject', also known as 'Course Designation'. Additional course requirements and electives are included in the associate and certificate programs.

 

CJS*H101
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 Credits

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the fields of law enforcement. Study includes an overview of crime and police problems, as well as organization of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. (fall/spring)

CJS*H102
Introduction to Corrections
3 Credits

An overview of the history and philosophy of the American correctional system, organization and operation of the components of the corrections systems, including correctional centers, prisons, probation, parole and community-based programs, correctional treatment programs ranging from pre-trial diversion to post incarceration procedures. Presentation and discussion of current issues and problems in corrections will be discussed. (fall)

CJS*H103
Introduction to Security
3 Credits

The historic, philosophical and legal basis of security, and the role of the security officer and his relationships with the public sector are studied. The functional operation of various specialized areas of security such as theft and risk control, security surveys and loss prevention, management in proprietary and government institutions, safety and fire protection and commercial and retail security is surveyed. (fall)

CJS*H105
Introduction to Law Enforcement
3 Credits

An introduction course that covers the basics of law enforcement, evolution of the police function, the police in the criminal justice system, and the social and psychological stresses and their effects on police work, health, and the family. The course also includes the study and analysis of the problems of law enforcement as they relate to the community. (spring)

CJS*H210
Constitutional Law
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course traces the history and development of the U.S. Constitution. Topics will include the Commerce Clause, procedural due process, states’ rights and civil liberties, the concept of federal supremacy, and state constitutions. (fall)

CJS*H211
Criminal Law I
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of substantive criminal law. Major elements of statutory offenses are discussed. Reference to the Connecticut Penal Code is included. (spring)

CJS*H217
American Legal Systems
3 Credits

This course studies the process through which justice is administered and the history of the American legal system. Also examined are the Constitution of the United States as it applies to police forces. Rules of evidence with attention given to judicial notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial evidence, burden of proof, documentary evidence, hearsay evidence, confessions and admissions will also be studied. Particular emphasis will be given to evidence, arrest procedures, as well as search and seizure. (fall)

CJS*H218
Legal Aspects of Security Operations
3 Credits

This course traces the development of the legal aspects of private security in the United States. Material includes the law as it relates to private security, search and seizure, civil and criminal liability, and evidence. Legal requirements such as licensing, training, and education are also examined. (fall)

CJS*H220
Criminal Investigation
3 Credits

This is an introduction to criminal investigation. Study includes the presentation of rules and procedures of preliminary investigation; art of interrogation and recording of statements and confessions; collection and preservation of physical evidence at the crime scene; methods used in scientific interpretation of evidence; and preparation of cases for trial. (spring)

CJS*H224
Computer Crimes
3 Credits

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various aspects of computer crimes, including hacking, computer break-ins, computer fraud, the introduction of viruses, worms, and trojan horses into computer systems, mail fraud, child pornography, pirated software, sabotage, and espionage. Study includes an overview of the various types of computer crimes likely to be encountered in today’s computer Environment, as well as the methods of preventing, investigating, and prosecuting those crimes. (fall)

CJS*H225
Forensic Science
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the recognition, preservation, and collection of physical evidence at the crime scene as well as the testing and analysis of the evidence at the forensic laboratory. The student will learn through lectures, class participation and discussion, and laboratory experiments.

CJS*H229
Crime Scene Investigation
3 Credits

This is an orientation course that covers the basics of crime scene investigation, including the crime scene, identifying and collecting evidence, and the capabilities and procedures of the crime laboratory. (fall)

CJS*H234
Computer Security and Data Protection
3 Credits

This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of computer security and data protection. Topics that will be covered include types of attacks on computer systems, risk analysis, strategies to counter these attacks and risks, internet security, hacking, and other criminal activity. (spring)

CJS*H235
Information Warfare and Security
3 Credits

This course traces the development of information warfare, terrorism, and espionage as they relate to the computer environment. Topics include the threats to military as well as commercial and economic security. The roles of individuals, corporations, and governments in dealing with information-related attacks will be examined. The problems and remedies associated with the topics will also be examined.(spring)

CJS*H230
Security Management
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course examines the functions of an integrated security program from a management perspective. Topics to be discussed include how a security organization is managed, actual situations that may be encountered, the duties of the security director, effective management skills, and the day-to-day management of the security function. (spring)

CJS*H232
Industrial and Retail Security
3 Credits

Prerequisites: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course examines the responsibilities of industrial security in preventing security related compromises against the company, individuals, and information. Thefts in companies and retail establishments will also be examined. Among other topics to be discussed are sabotage, espionage, physical security, theft prevention, internal control, and techniques of detection, apprehension and prevention. (spring)

CJS*H233
Institutional Security
3 Credits

Prerequisites: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the role of security as it applies to public and private institutions, such as hospitals, airports, and government agencies. The student will learn how an institution can be compromised by breaches of security. Topics to be discussed include physical security, internal control, processing clearances, safeguarding classified information, and visitor and area control. (fall)

CJS*H241
Correctional Counseling I
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is an introduction to various concepts, principles, and techniques of counseling as applied by trained professionals in the correctional setting. Group methods, evaluation, and therapeutic Environments will be examined as a means of promoting the understanding of the counseling process. Discussions will include the various counseling models and the history of counseling in correctional institutions and the community. (fall)

CJS*H244
Community Based Corrections
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course will examine alternatives to incarceration as viable sentencing options. Topics will include: the development of community corrections, parole, diversion, halfway houses, community service, house arrest, and electronic monitoring. The role of the victim in the correctional process will also be discussed. (spring)

CJS*H246
Juvenile Corrections
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course presents the correctional aspects of the history, philosophy and development of the juvenile justice system. Topics to be discussed include the rights of juveniles, alternatives to incarceration, incarceration, treatment methods, and current and future trends. (fall)

CJS*H255
Ethical Issues In Criminal Justice
3 Credits

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the necessity for high standards of ethical and moral behavior on the part of the law enforcement officer. Material will include the consequences of unethical and immoral behavior on the part of the law enforcement officer. Topics include gratuities, favoritism, temptations, dishonesty, abuse and misuse of authority. (fall)

CJS*H261
Victim and Offender Mediation
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. The process of victim and offender mediation and reconciliation is examined in this course. The effectiveness of the process in the offender rehabilitation will be discussed. Topics to be discussed include conflict resolution, bringing the victim and offender together, restitution of losses, reconciliation, mediation, and conflict management. (spring)

CJS*H280
Victimology
3 Credits

Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is a study of crime, its causes, and effects from the victim’s perspective. The course looks at victim precipitation, restitution, and the varied involvement in, and consequences of, crime on the victim. Major perspectives on victimization as well as patterns of victimization will be analyzed. (spring)

CJS*H293
Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience
3 Credits

Prerequisite: 12 credits in CJS*H courses, with grade of “C” or better. Cooperative Work Experience in Criminal Justice is essentially cooperative training between the school and agency. This required course introduces the student to a specific field in the Criminal Justice system. The course consists of: 1. Two-hour Professional Development Workshop 2. Minimum 145-hour (volunteer) or 225-hour (paid) Cooperative Work Experience 3. Weekly one-hour Co-op Seminar (fall/spring)

Department Head
Criminal Justice/Public Safety
Joseph Ward
203-596-8605 (p)
203-596-8755 (f)
Room: K609