Chris Collibee: News Assignment Editor, WFSB Channel 3 Eyewitness News

Last Updated Jul 2010


Chris graduated in 1997 from Amity High School in Woodbridge before attending Naugatuck Valley Community College, where he took an associate degree in general studies in 1999. At the College, he was the editor-in-chief of The Tamarack and a member of the Student Senate.

He transferred to the University of Connecticut where he earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism in 2002. His hobbies include hiking, kayaking, winter camping, traveling and being a “political and news geek.”

Chris works at WFSB Channel 3 Eyewitness News in Rocky Hill, where he is the news assignment editor. He is responsible for a variety of things in the newsroom, including generating story ideas, setting up stories, researching stories for news crews in the field and working with CNN and CBS news on national stories that have Connecticut angles.

“At any moment in my day, I can go from working on a story about puppies to working on a massive mill fire that is affecting multiple towns,” said Chris. “I never know what my day will have in store for me, which is the fun thing about what I do. If something happens in Connecticut, I am among the first to know about it. I have had a front row seat for some of Connecticut’s biggest news stories of the last decade, from Gov. John Rowland’s resignation to Connecticut allowing same-sex marriages. I have been here on Channel 3’s assignment desk moving crews around the state and making sure our viewers find out what is going on in their state.”

Chris said that studying at NVCC helped him get started in a career.

“When I came to Naugatuck Valley Community College in the fall of 1997, I was a scared 17-year-old who, like many other youngsters, did not know what my future would bring,” said Chris. “My first year at Naugatuck Valley brought me to a journalism class and The Tamarack newspaper. It was here I began to learn the art of journalism: how to enterprise stories, how to dig stories out and what happens when you make a simple mistake, like transposing a digit in a phone number. Over my two years at NVCC, I spent many late evenings working on the newspaper, frequently being at the College all weekend long before we could put an issue to print. When I graduated from Naugatuck Valley, I knew I was prepared to take on the next challenge at UConn’s journalism program. From UConn, I made my way to the top- rated TV station in the state, where I proudly work today. But it wouldn’t have happened without some of the great professors and fellow students I worked with back in Waterbury at Naugatuck Valley Community College.”