Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions

Download the 2017-18 College Catalog in PDF format.

Academic Affairs

Honors
HON-H200
Honors Special Topics Seminar
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Member of Honors Institute. "B" or better in ENG*H101 and MAT*H137. In this course Honors students will examine a current, "real world" topic from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each student will produce a final research, design, or artistic product that demonstrates independent exploration of the topic. Required for honors designation. Topic varies each semester.
Interdisciplinary Studies
IDS–H101
First Year Experience
1.5 Credits
The First Year Experience introduces students to diverse academic content, emphasizing the acquisition of learning strategies in preparation for rigorous college study. The content is designed to help students make a smooth transition to college. This course focuses on developing creative and critical thinking skills, developing information literacy and technology skills, improving written and oral communication, setting personal and academic goals, developing structured and consistent study habits, practicing effective time management, and becoming contributing members of the NVCC community. In addition, students will develop a comprehensive academic and career development plan leading to graduation. The course is required of all matriculating first-time, full-time students. There are no prerequisites.

Allied Health/Nursing/Physical Education

EMT-Paramedic
EMT*H100
Emergency Medical Technician- Basic (EMT-B)
6 Credits
This course includes classroom and clinical experiences and provides students the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills required for EMT-B National Certification. Emphasis is placed on patient assessment, clinical signs and symptoms, pathophysiology and pre-hospital care of patients. Areas of instruction include CPR, airway essentials, assessment and care of trauma and medical patients including infants, children and the elderly, rescue operations, hazardous materials and pharmacological interventions. Clinical rotation in an emergency room is required. (spring) Health Requirements: Students will be required to submit the completed immunization and medical compliancy requirements before participating in the clinical observation component of this program. Students will receive a packet of information describing current college policies from the course instructor. Criminal Background Checks: Many clinical sites are now requiring that criminal background checks, be completed on any students who will be attending a clinical rotation at those facilities. Students must follow instructions for obtaining a background check provided to them by the course instructor. Students who are found guilty of having committed a felony/misdemeanor may be prevented from participating in clinical experiences. If you cannot participate in a clinical rotation at an assigned facility, you may not be able to complete the objectives of the course. Specific situations are reviewed by college personnel. Students are responsible for fees associated with health requirements and background checks.
Nursing
NUR*H101
Introduction To Nursing Practice
8 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the College and the Nursing Program. The student will focus on concepts basic to nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on application of the nursing process, communication skills, and nursing practice procedure acquisition. Clinical and laboratory experiences offer opportunities to integrate theoretical principles and demonstrate caring and competence in beginning professional role development.
NUR*H102
Family Health Nursing
8 Credits
Prerequisites: NUR*H101, PSY*H111, BIO*H235. Corequisite: NUR*H103. The student will focus on issues affecting the family, including childbearing, childrearing, geriatric care and intermediate health care needs of limited duration. The medical surgical health problems include care for the client in the peri-operative period and the client experiencing orthopedic and simple genitourinary conditions. The course addresses several psychiatric disorders: anxiety and cognitive disorders, common child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. The student will have clinical rotations that provide experience caring for the childbearing family as well as caring for medical-surgical clients across the lifespan.
NUR*H103
Pharmacology for Families Across the Lifespan
1 Credits
Prerequisite: NUR*H101. Corequisite: NUR*H102. The student will focus on the safe use, pharmacological principles, indications and nursing implications related to drug therapy when caring for individuals and families. Emphasis will be on medications used with perinatal, neonatal, pediatric, geriatric and peri-operative clients. The course will stress the general characteristics of selected medications and will include indications, pharmacokinetics, side effects, adverse effects, contraindications, administration, nursing implications across the lifespan, client education and relationship to prior learning.
NUR*H130
LPN to RN Transition I
1 Credits
Prerequisites: NUR 190: LPN to RN Articulation Bridge Course (Charter Oak State College.) This course is the final component of the Connecticut League for Nursing LPN to RN Articulation Plan for the Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Program (CT-CCNP) which prepares LPNs to enter the CT-CCNP in the second year of study. Students enrolling in this course have been accepted for admission into the (CT-CCNP) and have chosen the option to enter the third semester. Hours: Clinical: 45 hours (Clinical and laboratory hour distribution is at the discretion of the college attended.)
NUR*H201
Nursing Care of Individuals and Families 1
9 Credits
Prerequisites: NUR*H102, NUR*H103, PSY*H201, SOC*H101. Corequisite: NUR*H202. The student will focus on holistic care of individuals and families across the lifespan with a variety of health care needs. The needs of clients experiencing endocrine, respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular conditions and selected mental health disorders are examined. Bioterrorism as a health care issue will be addressed. Clinical laboratory experience provides the student an opportunity to administer care to a diverse population of clients in a variety of acute care and community health care settings. The student will utilize critical thinking, caring, professionalism and communication skills in the care of the client. Emphasis is placed on provision of safe and competent care and development of the professional role as a member of a multidisciplinary health care team. Over the semester, the student is increasingly challenged in the clinical area with more complex client assignments.
NUR*H202
Pharmacology for Individuals and Families with Intermediate Health Care Needs
1 Credits
Prerequisite: NUR*H102, NUR*H103. Corequisite: NUR*H201. The student will focus on pharmacologic principles related to the care of individuals and families across the lifespan with intermediate health care needs. Emphasis will be placed on medications used for clients who have endocrine, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, autoimmune, and psychiatric conditions and clients who are survivors of bioterrorism.
NUR*H203
Nursing Care of Individuals and Families II
8 Credits
Prerequisite: NUR*H201, NUR*H202, ENG*H102. Corequisite: NUR*H204, NUR*H205. The student will focus on the holistic care of individuals, families, and groups with complex health care needs. The student will incorporate critical thinking, caring behaviors, professionalism, and communication skills when providing nursing care in a variety of acute, long-term and/or community settings. Students will have an opportunity to manage a multi client assignment with an emphasis on safe and competent practice. An observational experience with a visiting nurse agency, a dialysis unit and/or a cancer center will be provided.
NUR*H204
Pharmacology for Individuals, Families and Groups with Complex Health Care Needs
1 Credits
Prerequisite: NUR*H201, NUR*H202. Corequisite: NUR*H203. The student will focus on safe use, pharmacologic principles, indications and nursing implications related to drug therapy in the care of individuals, families, and groups with complex health care needs. Emphasis will be placed on medications used for clients who have acute and chronic renal failure, oncology and neurological conditions, and multi-system dysfunction and who choose an alternative therapy.
NUR*H205
Nursing Management and Trends
2 Credits
Prerequisite: NUR*H201, NUR*H202. Corequisite: NUR*H203, NUR*H204. The student will explore the basic principles of management, leadership and collaborative relationships as they relate to providing safe and competent care. The focus is on the utilization of critical thinking skills to make decisions on priority setting, delegation, legal parameters of nursing practice and ethical issues. Students will expand the concept of caring to the profession of nursing through collegial and interdisciplinary communication. This course facilitates the transition for students into the profession and their role in contemporary nursing practice.
Physical Education
HPE*H101
Weight Control and Exercise
2 Credits
Designed to help students realize the importance of healthy diet and exercise behaviors in permanent weight control. Behavior modification techniques are used to help students achieve a healthy lifestyle that will result in either a gradual reduction in body weight, and/or the maintenance of a healthy body weight.
HPE*H103
Concepts in Fitness
2 Credits
Physical fitness and exercise is designed to provide the background information concerning exercise prescription development and follow through. Participants will be trained in exercise testing theory and ethics, and practical exercise prescription. Students will participate in lecture and laboratories to develop their own exercise prescription.
HPE*H114
Aerobics
2 Credits
Modern methodologies skills and systems of exercising through dance are introduced and practiced. The physical condition of the body, the levels of cardiovascular fitness and individual physical differences are stressed.
HPE*H117
Weight Training
2 Credits
Emphasis of this course is on the development of a high degree of individual skills and methods necessary to understand the body mechanics involved in activity exercise. Programs discussed will include training for leisure sports, rehabilitation, muscular tone, endurance, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, and weight loss.
HPE*H118
Power Walking
2 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the values and purposes of power walking through brief lecture and practical experience. The course will also introduce aerobics as an alternative program.
HPE*H140
Pilates/Wellness
1 Credits
(also listed as DAN*H140) This course focuses on the quality of movement, posture and breathing by increasing strength, flexibility, and balance. The holistic perspective includes physical awareness, cognitive reflection, and insights from feelings and focuses on mind-body centering. Pilates/Wellness is designed for the dancer, athlete, health professional or persons interested in overall well-being. This class meets the first ten weeks of the semester. Comfortable clothing is necessary.
HPE*H147
Self-Defense I
1 Credits
This course is designed to promote the methods and skills to understand and perform the art of karate for self-defense and discipline. It includes the study of history, philosophy and culture of the martial art of karate.
HPE*H148
Self-Defense II
1 Credits
Prerequisite: HPE*H147. This course is advanced study in the art and methods of self-defense including elements of physical fitness. Students who enroll in this course will be given a promotion test for belt certification.
HPE*H220
Coaching Adolescents
3 Credits
This course consists of three modules: sports management, biomechanics studies, and principles of coaching. It is intended for those who do not hold a teaching degree and need to meet the State of Connecticut requirements for a coaching permit.
HPE*H230
First Aid
3 Credits
This course prepares the student, through development of skill and knowledge, to give proper care to the injured and seriously ill. This practical course stresses prevention of accidents and early medical care in sudden illness. Better personal health habits, family health habits, and an interest in community-wide health problems are developed. Red Cross First Aid Certification is included in the completion of coursework and meets the State of Connecticut requirements leading to a coaching permit.
HPE*H255
Physical Fitness Through Physical Education
2 Credits
This course will allow the student to explore several types of life-time and recreational sports. Students will rotate activities every three weeks throughout the semester. The physical education activities will be selected by the instructor.
HPE*H261
Yoga
1 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the methods and skills necessary to understand and perform Yoga. Relaxation techniques and flexibility training are stressed.
HPE*H264
Yoga
2 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the methods and skills necessary to understand and perform Yoga. Relaxation techniques and flexibility training are stressed.
Physical Therapist Assistant
PTA*H120
Introduction to Physical Therapy
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the PTA Program and PTA*H125. Learning opportunities in this course assist the student to recognize the roles of physical therapy within various practice settings. Students differentiate functions of physical therapists and physical therapist assistants as members of the health care team through study of the history of physical therapy, documentation, ethical and legal principles, evidence based practice, and medical terminology important to the provision of services. Learning also includes development of knowledge and abilities within the domains of professional conduct, interpersonal and professional communication, and sensitivity to individual and cultural differences.
PTA*H125
PT for Function - NEW!
4 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the PTA Program and PTA*H120. This lecture and lab-based course, provides the student with introductory concepts and techniques regarding physical therapy interventions for function and mobility. Emphasis is placed on enhancing the students' problem-solving abilities and comprehension of the physical therapist assistant's role. The importance of modification of physical therapy interventions within the plan of care developed by the supervising physical therapist is highlighted. The laboratory section of this course allows the student to develop the psychomotor skills through simulated patient scenarios.
PTA*H130
Clinical Anatomy and Kinesiology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: BIO*H211. This course is designed to enable students to identify the structure and function of the human body including the spine, upper and lower extremities through computer simulation and application. The course includes the study of skeletal and muscular structures involved in human movement. Students will understand movement control and elements of movement dysfunction. The student will also gain an understanding of biomechanical forces, neuromuscular control, and pathological influences through analysis of biomechanical forces on the body.
PTA*H220
Introduction to the PT Clinic
1 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H120 and PTA*H125 with a grade of “C” or higher. This course provides an orientation to the physical therapy clinic and to the provision of physical therapy interventions. Students develop communication, intervention, and problem-solving techniques within the physical therapy clinic.
PTA*H230
Physical Agents in PT
4 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H120 and PTA*H125 with a grade of “C” or higher. This course develops the student’s competence with problem-solving and application of physical therapy interventions using physical agents, including therapeutic applications of heat, cold, water, electricity, light and mechanical forces or devices.
PTA*H235
Kinesiology for Rehabilitation
4 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H120 and PTA*H125 with a grade of “C” or higher. This course fosters learning of the anatomical and biomechanical principles of human movement through the study of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Competencies attained include accurate data collection by goniometry, manual muscle testing, posture and gait analysis including the effects of biomechanical forces on the human body.
PTA*H250
Therapeutic Exercise
5 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H230 and PTA*H235 with a grade of “C” or higher. Learning includes the theory and techniques to safely and effectively implement therapeutic exercise interventions based on a plan of care established by a physical therapist. Students also develop competence to measure a patient’s response to interventions and respond accordingly and to provide effective instruction to patients and caregivers.
PTA*H253
Pathophysiology for Rehabilitation
3 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H230 and PTA*H235 with a grade of “C” or higher. This course develops comprehension about abnormalities and the physical, physiological and psychological changes that occur throughout the human lifespan. The student learns the effects of pathology on the rehabilitation of patients with orthopedic, neurological, and general medical conditions.
PTA*H258
PTA in the Healthcare Arena
2 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H230 and 235 with a grade of “C” or higher. This course develops the student’s ability to apply physical therapy interventions and data collection techniques within the clinic environment and advances the student’s abilities with communication, conduct and problem-solving within the structure of the health care system.
PTA*H260
Physical Therapy Seminar
2 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA-H250, 253 and 258 with a grade of “C” or higher. In this course students demonstrate the ability to apply principles of problem solving to selected professional issues, industry trends, and special populations that may be encountered as a physical therapist assistant. Learning opportunities assist in the transition from student to clinician and identification of interest areas for lifelong learning.
PTA*H262
PTA Internship II
5 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H250, 253 and 258 with a grade of “C” or higher. Within this clinic-based course students learn to integrate and apply physical therapy concepts and to effectively perform physical therapy interventions as a physical therapist assistant. Students develop their abilities for daily organization and management of a patient caseload and effectively contribute to the health care team.
PTA*H265
PTA Internship III
5 Credits
Prerequisites: PTA*H250, 253 and 258 with a grade of “C” or higher. Within this clinic-based course students learn to problem-solve and competently function in the clinic Environment as a physical therapist assistant. Students develop competence with time management, clinical prioritization and the entry-level abilities of the physical therapist assistant prior to course completion.
Radiologic Technology
RAD*H112
Orientation to Radiology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission into the program. This course provides an orientation to radiology, basic radiation protection, ethics, medical terminology, communication, and patient care.
RAD*H113
Rad. Physics / Radiographic Quality I
3 Credits
Prerequisite RAD*H112 & H197. The course content includes the production of x-rays, the x-ray circuit, radiographic equipment, and the interaction of x-rays with matter. Once learned, the student will utilize the preceding content, applying it to how the x-ray produces the image. The subject material includes introductory principles of radiographic quality, a general overview of radiographic film, intensifying screens, film processing, setting technical factors, and performing technical conversions.
RAD*H114
Contrast Media Procedures & Radiographic Quality II
3 Credits
Prerequisite RAD*H113 & H198. The course content is divided between two main topics. The first half of the summer session will cover radiologic procedures involving the use of contrast media. Also discussed will be the hazards, complications, and risk factors of contrast media. The second half of the session is a continuation of Radiographic Quality I. Topics include image formation, technical conversions and critiquing the radiograph. Part of the Advanced Manufacturing Machine Technology cohort program
RAD*H200
Radiologic Physics & Diagnostic Imaging Modalities
3 Credits
Prerequisite: RAD*H114& H199 This course provides the student with advanced study of fluoroscopy, physics, computed radiography, digital radiography, digital fluoroscopy, and quality assurance/quality control techniques used to evaluate radiographic imaging equipment
RAD*H215
Radiographic Pathology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: RAD*H200, H222, & H297 This course provides an overview of pathological conditions that are demonstrated with diagnostic imaging. Lecture material will include the cause and treatment of the disease. Pediatric radiology is also presented.
RAD*H217
Seminar in Radiology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: RAD*H215 & H298. A case study approach provides a comprehensive investigation of patient care, emphasizing radiologic procedures.
RAD*H222
Radiobiology & Protection
3 Credits
Prerequisite: RAD*H114& H199 Topics include Radiobiology, health physics, radiation safety, safety requirements for equipment, and protection.
Respiratory Care
RSP*H112
Fundamentals of Respiratory Care
4 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the Program. A lecture-laboratory course that provides an introduction to basic principles of clinical respiratory care integrating physical principles of respiratory care throughout the course. Topics covered include: principles of infection control, medical gas therapy, aerosol and humidity therapy and basic patient assessment. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory exercises weekly. Corequisite RSP*H121.
RSP*H121
Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the Program. This course includes an in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the pulmonary and cardiac system. Topics will include but are not limited to: the circulatory system, applied physiology and physical principles of the respiratory system and gas exchange. Emphasis will be placed on structure and function. Corequisite RSP*H112.
RSP*H131
Applied Pharmacology
3 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H112, RSP*H121 with grades of “C” or better. This course includes the study of the composition, indications for and effects of medication administered to patients treated in the field of respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on drugs prescribed for the cardiopulmonary, renal and neurological system. Corequisite RSP*H141.
RSP*H141
Principles of Respiratory Care
4 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H112, RSP*H121 with grades of “C” or better. This course introduces the student to basic principles of clinical respiratory care. Topics include but are not limited to: medical gas therapy, patient assessment, OSHA and infection control standards, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, bronchial hygiene therapy, hyperinflation therapy, ethics and professionalism, medical documentation. An integrated laboratory experience is included. Corequisites RSP*H180 and RSP*H131.
RSP*H151
Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology and Diagnostics
3 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H131, RSP*H141 with grades of “C” or better. This course focuses on the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and treatment of various cardiopulmonary diseases and diseases that directly affect the cardiopulmonary system. Case application will be included. Corequisite RSP*H181.
RSP*H180
Clinical Practicum
1 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to the program. This course provides supervised clinical experience in providing basic respiratory care to patients. Clinical experiences will focus on the areas of chart review, documentation and reporting, bedside assessment, breathing exercises, infection control techniques, medical gas therapy, and aerosol drug delivery. Corequisites RSP*H141 and RSP*H131.
RSP*H181
Clinical Practicum II
2 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H180, RSP*H141, RSP*H131 with grades of “C” or better. This course provides supervised clinical experience in providing respiratory therapy to medical floor patients. Clinical experiences will focus on bronchial hygiene therapy, hyperinflation therapy, bi-level ventilation, airway management, and arterial blood gas sampling. Students will also rotate to ancillary clinical sites focusing on respiratory therapy provided at extended care and rehabilitation facilities. Corequisite RSP*H151.
RSP*H201
Future Trends
2 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H262, RSP*H270, RSP*H281 with grades of “C” or better. This seminar course focuses on the various current issues affecting respiratory care. Topics include but are not limited to: smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation, communication styles for various age ranges, research methods and statistics. Corequisites RSP*H282 and RSP*H291.
RSP*H262
Advanced Principles of Respiratory Care
4 Credits
RSP*H270
Hemodynamic and Critical Care Monitoring
3 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H151, RSP*H181 with grades of “C” or better. This course focuses on hemodynamic monitoring and assessment on the adult critical care unit. Topics include: EKG rhythm interpretation, central venous pressure monitoring, pulmonary artery pressure monitoring, ACLS overview and intracranial pressure monitoring. Corequisites RSP*H262 and RSP*H281.
RSP*H271
Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Diagnostics
2 Credits
Prerequisite: RSP*H151 with grade of “C” or better. This course provides the student instruction on assessment of pulmonary function studies and other diagnostic procedures used within a pulmonary/cardiovascular laboratory setting. Topics include: stress testing, metabolic testing, rehabilitation techniques, sleep studies and research techniques.
RSP*H281
Advanced Clinical Practicum
2 Credits
Prerequisites: BIO*H212, RSP*H151, RSP*H181 with grades of “C” or better. This course provides supervised clinical experience in providing respiratory therapy to intensive care patients. Clinical experiences will focus on mechanical ventilation of the adult patient. Corequisites RSP*H262 and RSP*H270 .
RSP*H282
Advanced Clinical Practicum II
2 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H262, RSP*H270, RSP*H281 with grades of “C” or better. This course provides supervised clinical experiences in the adult, neonatal, and pediatric intensive care units. Clinical experiences will focus on hemodynamic monitoring and assessment, respiratory care in the emergency setting, and continuous mechanical ventilation of the adult, neonate, and pediatric patient. Students will also complete an Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course during this clinical practicum. Corequisites RSP*H201 and RSP*H292.
RSP*H291
Perinatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care
2 Credits
Prerequisites: RSP*H270, RSP*H262, RSP*H281 with grades of “C” or better. This course provides the student with a comprehensive study of pediatric and neonatal respiratory care. Topics include but are not limited to: diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, cardiopulmonary pathophysiology, ventilator management, critical care techniques, PALS and NRP techniques and embryology. Corequisite RSP*H282.

Business

Accounting
ACC*H113
Principles of Financial Accounting
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ACC*H113 is a rigorous college level course. Students should have completed all developmental course work. The course offers an introduction to financial accounting with an emphasis on the use and interpretation of financial accounting information. It introduces the student to the balance sheet, income statement, statement of retained earnings, the cash flow statement and the operation of an accounting information system. The course focuses on the fundamental theory and principles of accounting, and utilizes accounting procedures to clarify and demonstrate the underlying concepts. The computer is used in this course.
ACC*H117
Principles of Managerial Accounting
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ACC*H113. The major objectives of this course are to introduce management tools and models that use accounting information. The use of accounting information for planning, controlling, and decision-making is explored in topics including cost behavior, budgeting and cost accounting. The analysis and interpretation of information are stressed in this rigorous one semester management accounting course. The computer is used in this course.
ACC*H123
Accounting Software Applications
3 Credits
Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in ACC*H113, CSA*H105, and MAT*H137. Corequisite: ACC*H117. Recognizing the importance of computer skills in accounting, this course is designed to acquaint the student with techniques and procedures in using microcomputers as a problem-solving tool in accounting and related disciplines. A PC accounting package and a computerized spreadsheet package will be used in the course. The course will be appropriately rigorous, and the spreadsheet usage will be centered around problems typical of a second semester accounting course.
ACC*H241
Federal Taxes I
3 Credits
The Federal Income Tax course is a one-semester study of the Internal Revenue Code as it pertains to individuals. Its purpose is to introduce the student to the federal income tax laws and the application of those laws to the preparation of tax returns.
ACC*H271
Intermediate Accounting I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in ACC*H117. This course is designed to develop a high level of technical competence. Beginning with basic accounting issues, the course develops students’ skills to the point at which they can handle complex professional level problems requiring not only a knowledge of procedures, but also a keen awareness of the concepts behind them. Consideration is given to analysis and interpretation of financial data.
ACC*H272
Intermediate Accounting II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in ACC*H117. ACC*H272 is a continuation of the studies begun in CCT-H201. Particular emphasis is on the topics involving financial statement reporting and disclosure. Subjects covered in depth include current and long-term liabilities, long term investments, the accounting for corporate capital, retained earnings and dividends, the preparation of the Cash Flow Statement, and Income Tax Accounting.
Automotive Technician
ATP*H100
Integrated Automotive Systems
3 Credits
This is an introductory course for the Automotive Technician providing the theory for a foundation in the field. Emphasis will be on basic automotive service procedures and the inter-relationship of the various automotive systems. Shop safety, proper care and use of tools are included. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H110
Automotive Electrical Systems
3 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 and MAT*H095 or satisfactory completion of College placement test or with permission of the Coordinator. The study of electrical theory and nomenclature along with applications of electrical/electronic systems. To include, but is not limited to: starting, charging, lighting, wiring, accessories, diagnosis and repairs. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H120
Engine Repair
3 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 or with permission of the Coordinator. Diagnosis of automotive engines and their lubrication and cooling systems. Included is engine construction, operation along with disassembly and assembly techniques. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H130
Brakes
3 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 or with permission of the Coordinator. Covers the maintenance, diagnosis and repair procedures of disc and/or drum brake systems including ABS (antilock brakes) along with their mechanical, hydraulic and electrical components. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H140
Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning
3 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 or with permission of the Coordinator. Theory-related instruction of the automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Emphasis is placed on basic refrigerant cycles, heat transfer, trouble shooting, and diagnosis of both refrigerant and electronic control systems. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H150
Suspension and Steering
3 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 or with permission of the Coordinator. The diagnosis and repair of steering and suspension systems and their inter-relationship to wheel alignment. The course includes a thorough knowledge of wheel and tire maintenance. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H185
Automotive Service and Parts Department Management
2 Credits
Prerequisite: ATP*H100 or with the permission of Coordinator. Topics in this course include marketing techniques, financial analysis, personnel management, work scheduling and distribution, and use of pricing manuals. An in-depth study of parts numbering, storage, cataloging, retrieval, ordering, and stocking management techniques will be discussed. Two lecture hours weekly.
ATP*H190
Metallurgy/Welding
2 Credits
In the automotive field, the use of the oxyacetylene torch and the mig welder is common place. Automotive technicians need to be able to use the processes of welding and brazing, etc. safely and skillfully. This course offers both theory and a practical lab section so students will be both skilled and knowledgeable in all the welding technology covered. One-hour lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly.
ATP*H210
Engine Performance
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ATP*H110 or with permission of the Coordinator. Fuel theory and nomenclature necessary to service and repair computerized automotive fuel systems. This includes but is not limited to computer controls, ignition, fuel, exhaust and emission systems and their maintenance, diagnosis, adjustments and repair. Two hours lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H220
Automotive Emissions
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ATP*H210 or with permission of the Coordinator. This is a continuation of ATP*H210, emphasizing practical application on the cause and effect of HC, CO, and NOx emissions. This includes various systems diagnosis, containing but not limited to, general powertrain, computerized powertrain controls, fuel and air induction, emissions control, and I/M failure.Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours laboratory weekly.
ATP*H261
Manual Drive Train and Axles
2 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 or with permission of the Coordinator. The diagnosis and repair of manual drive transmissions and transaxles. This includes clutches, drive (half) shaft, and universal joints along with rear axle and four wheel drive components. One-hour lecture two hours lab weekly.
ATP*H262
Automatic Transmission and Transaxle I
2 Credits
Corequisite: ATP*H100 or with permission of the Coordinator. The operation, diagnosis and maintenance of automatic transmission and transaxles to include in-vehicle and off-vehicle adjustments and repair. One-hour lecture and two hours lab weekly.
ATP*H270
Introduction to Diesel Mechanics
3 Credits
Coerequisites: ATP*H100 or with permission of Coordinator. The course introduces the diesel engine, its capabilities, operations, and its unique engine fuel delivery systems. Two-hour lecture and two and one-half hours of laboratory weekly.
ATP*H280
Alternative Fuel Vehicle Fundamentals
2 Credits
This course is designed to prepare automotive technicians, dealers, and repairers to take the ASE Alternative Fuel Vehicle Certification examinations. It covers fundamental procedures, operations, safety, regulations and inspection of Alternative Fuel Vehicles. One-hour lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly.
ATP*H290
Cooperative Work Experience I
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ATP*H100, 110, 120, 130, 150, ENG*H101, minimum 30 credits of course work completed and a 2.5 GPA, or with permission of Coordinator. This required course is designed to bridge the gap between academic theory and practical work experience. It consists of a minimum 250-hour Cooperative Work Experience
ATP*H291
Cooperative Work Experience II
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ATP*H290 and a minimum of 40 credits of course work completed and a 2.5 GPA, or with permission of Coordinator. This required course is designed to bridge the gap between academic theory and practical work experience. It consists of a minimum 250-hour Cooperative Work Experience.
Aviation Science
AVS*H101
Private Pilot Lecture
3 Credits
Corequisite: AVS*H201. This ground school course includes coverage of basic flight concepts, principles of meteorology, aeronautical charts and publications, pre-flight planning, flight computer and plotter, basic radio navigation, Federal Aviation Regulations, basic aerodynamics, aircraft avionics, and emergency procedures. This course prepares students for the FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Test.
AVS*H103
Instrument Lecture
3 Credits
Prerequisite: AVS*H101, AVS*H201. This ground school course includes coverage of human factors and aviation physiology, the construction, use and interpretation of aircraft instruments used in instrument flight, Federal Aviation Regulations, instrument navigation, the ATC system, aeronautical charts and publications related to instrument flight, instrument approaches, weather analysis for instrument operations, and instrument emergency procedures. This course prepares students for the FAA Instrument Rating Knowledge Test.
AVS*H104
Commercial Pilot Lecture
3 Credits
Prerequisite: AVS*H103, AVS*H203. This ground school course includes coverage of advanced human factors and aeronautical decision making for commercial operations, advanced navigation, advanced aircraft systems, advanced aerodynamics and commercial maneuvers, and emergency procedures for commercial operations. This course prepares students for the FAA Commercial Pilot Knowledge Test.
AVS*H120
Foundations of Aviation
3 Credits
This course explores the events that have shaped the development of aviation from the earliest attempts at flight up to the present day. The historical foundation of aviation is used to develop an understanding of the economic, social, and political impact of aviation on society.
AVS*H130
Air Transportation System
3 Credits
This course provides a historical background and an overview of the major segments of the air transportation industry. Current state and federal agencies and the regulations influencing air transportation, as well as the basis for their establishment, are also discussed. Requirements of the past, present and future with respect to aircraft and engine design, airports and supporting facilities are reviewed and evaluated. Students are introduced to the economics of airline operations and maintenance, and the general factors that influence an airline’s survival and profitability.
AVS*H140
Aerospace Safety
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the role of government agencies in ensuring aerospace safety. The ways in which airlines and airports ensure public safety and security will also be discussed. Emphasis will be on critical analysis of case studies involving investigations and prevention of aircraft accidents
AVS*H150
Airport Management I
3 Credits
This course provides an overview of the operational requirements needed for airports and airport terminals with an emphasis on the facilities that comprise an airport system, including airspace, airfield, terminal, and ground access operations. The financial aspects of airport planning as well as airport capacity considerations are also discussed.
AVS*H151
Airport Management II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: AVS*H150. This course is a continuation of AVS*H150. Emphasis is on managing daily airport operations, airport organization and administration, and financial management of the airport facility. Airport improvements and the relationship of airports with tenants and the general public are also discussed.
AVS*H201
Private Pilot Flight Training Lab
3 Credits
Corequisite: AVS*H101. ALL FLIGHT TRAINING COSTS ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. Students will receive approximately 50 hours of flight instruction covering topics that include pre-flight operations, aircraft systems, ground operations, basic flight maneuvers, ground reference maneuvers, normal and emergency procedures, cross-country operations, and flight by reference to instruments. Co-op instruction is designed to augment students’ flight training and includes the use of a flight simulator as well as classroom discussion of selected topics. This course prepares students for the FAA Private Pilot Practical Test (ASEL).
AVS*H203
Instrument Flight Training Lab
3 Credits
Corequisite: AVS*H103. ALL FLIGHT TRAINING COSTS ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. Students will receive approximately 50 hours of flight instruction covering topics that include pre-flight operations, full and partial panel procedures, systems and equipment malfunction, instrument navigation techniques, holding and approach procedures, and emergency procedures for instrument flight. Co-op instruction is designed to augment students’ flight training and includes the use of a flight simulator as well as classroom discussion of selected topics. This course prepares students for the FAA Instrument Rating Practical Test (ASEL).
AVS*H204
Commercial Flight Training Lab
3 Credits
Corequisite?: AVS*H104. ALL FLIGHT TRAINING COSTS ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. Students will receive approximately 120 hours of flight instruction covering topics that include pre-flight operations, aircraft systems, advanced ground operations, advanced flight maneuvers, normal and emergency procedures, commercial cross-country operations, and complex aircraft operations. Co-op instruction is designed to augment students’ flight training and includes the use of a flight simulator as well as classroom discussion of selected topics. This course prepares students for the FAA Commercial Pilot Practical Test (ASEL).
AVS*H255
Human Factors in Aviation
3 Credits
This course explores physiological and cognitive factors such as hypoxia, disorientation, stress, fatigue, anxiety and the effects of alcohol and other drugs on critical judgment and decision making processes of operational personnel in aviation. Investigation of our unique human capabilities and limitations is used to develop strategies to improve the performance of flight crews, air traffic controllers, flight management and other operational personnel as they identify and respond to critical, time-sensitive situations in aviation operations.
Business Finance
Computer Information Systems
CSC*H101
Introduction to Computers
3 Credits
This is an introductory course in information technology concepts and software productivity tools intended for Computer Information Systems majors and other students interested in computers and Information Technology. Areas of instruction include computer concepts, current topics and trends in information technology, the role of computer systems in business problem solving, an introduction to the major career areas of Information Technology and Microsoft Office skills that are important to all college students.
CSC*H113
Programming I
3 Credits
Fundamentals of programming and program development techniques. This is a first step programming course which emphasizes problem solving and sound programming practices. No previous programming experience is necessary. Topics include data types, functions, storage class, selection, repetition, pointers, arrays, and file processing. Programming laboratory projects in a laboratory environment are supervised by the instructor.
CSC*H183
Information Systems in Organizations
3 Credits
The focus of this course is on how organizations use information systems for decision making. In particular, the course stresses the role of managers in the analysis, design, development, implementation, maintenance and control of information systems as corporate resources. Course includes a hands-on approach to communications using workgroup software.
CSC*H205
Visual Basic I
3 Credits
This course uses Visual Basic .NET, an object-oriented/event-driven language, to teach programming concepts. Through “hands-on” application of the concepts presented in the lectures and tutorials, the student will learn the Visual Basic .NET tools used to create applications that correspond to Windows standards. By the end of the course, the student will be able to design and code simple business applications and will be prepared for more advanced courses in programming using VB, C++, etc.
CSC*H206
VISUAL BASIC II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205. The course covers a wide range of advanced programming topics using Visual Basic.NET an object oriented, event driven programming language. The goal of the course is to develop computer programming skills beyond the basics covered in the introductory course. This includes arrays and collections, object variables, database programming, web programming, web services, and extensive use of the .NET classes.
CSC*H211
VB & ASP .NET Web Programming
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205. This course covers a wide range of topics in the area of web application development using Microsoft ASP .NET. and the Visual Basic programming language. After an introduction to basic web design techniques, students will progress to more advanced e-commerce applications. Topics include working with server controls, validation techniques, managing state, authenticating users, and the use of themes. Relational databases are a big part of e-commerce applications and are also an important topic area in this course.
CSC*H213
Object-Oriented Programming Using C++
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205, CSC*H113, or any programming language equivalent. This course is designed for a more advanced programming student who wish to learn C++ with object-oriented techniques. The course will contain the basic concepts of an object-oriented programming language. Topics will include classes, constructor and destructor functions, function overloading, operator overloading, class inheritance, polymorphism, stream input/output, manipulator functions, templates and exception handling.
CSC*H214
Advanced C++ Programming
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H213. Topics include methods and techniques used in software development cycles. You will learn to move beyond a simple mastery of syntax. You will learn to increase productivity by combining tools, idioms, syntax, and libraries. Numerous hands-on exercises provide real-world experience in developing high quality C++. Throughout the course, you gain extensive hands-on experience with advanced C++ programming techniques. You will be required to develop complete programs from architectural design through to refining the implementation via a series of exercises.
CSC*H217
Object-Oriented Programming Using C#
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205 or CSC*H113 or any programming languages equivalent. This course offers students the opportunity to extend their experience and programming skills in the area of .NET development. C# (pronounced C Sharp) is an object-oriented programming language with syntax similar to JAVA, C# is becoming increasingly popular with developers in the areas of Windows applications and web sites using relational databases. Using the Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE) the course will cover topics including arrays, methods, classes, objects, inheritance, and exception handling, File Streams and database applications will also be an important part of the course..
CSC*H220
Object-Oriented Programming Using JAVA
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205, CSC*H113 or any programming language equivalent. This course will be an introduction to the Java programming language. We will develop Java applications as well as introduce World Wide Web browser Java applets. We will cover basic control structures and introduce the Object- Oriented (OO) paradigm utilizing classes and objects. We will introduce and develop programs which are event driven. There will be a wide use of the Java Abstract Window Toolkit. The OO model will be used in developing object-based and object-oriented programs. Finally, we will explore the toolkit to develop GUI-based, event-driven programs. There will be several programming assignments. Two tests will be given during the semester in addition to a final exam.
CSC*H227
Web Programming with Java
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H220, CSC*H113. This course picks up where the first Java Programming course left off, introducing the topics of threading and I/O. The remainder of the course serves to extend the student's knowledge of using Java to build enterprise-strength applications, with exposure to both "fat" and "thin" client structures. The course will cover currently used structures of JBDC connectivity, JavaBeans, servlets, JSP and XML and XHTML.
CSC*H228
Mobile Device Programming
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205, CSC*H113 or any programming language equivalent. This course is designed as an introduction to mobile device programming. It is intended for students with an interest in learning to develop applications which will run on Android based smart phones. Prior programming experience using Visual Basic, Java or C++ is expected.
CSC*H231
Database Design I
3 Credits
An introduction to relational database design. Included will be topics on the evolution of database design, data structures, designing a database, normalizing a database design and implementation of databases utilizing one or more of the popular PC database packages available such as Microsoft SQL Server.
CSC*H237
Database Programming with VB.NET
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H205. This course covers a wide range of relational database programming topics using Visual Basic .NET and ADO .NET objects. Students will learn programming techniques using the Microsoft SQL Server relational database, the .NET System.Data namespace and classes, and disconnected architecture. Topics include SQL queries to create typed and untyped datasets, table relationships, parameterized queries, bound and unbound controls, and data views. Crystal Reports, XML Schema Designer, and Server Explorer tools are used in a hands-on class/lab environment.
CSC*H250
Systems Analysis and Design
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Any programming language equivalent. This course is an introduction to systems analysis and design concepts and techniques. Using a case study method, students will conduct system surveys, create feasibility studies, and design typical computer systems used in business and industry.
CSC*H252
Information Systems Project Management
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC H101 or any programming language equivalent. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of managing Information Systems and Business projects. Students will learn how to initiate, plan, execute, control, and complete projects in order to meet organizational goals. In addition to traditional project management tools like PERT and GANTT charts, students will learn to use a project management software simulation tool to assist them in managing classroom projects. A comprehensive final project will be assigned and completed either individually or in collaboration with a student project team.
CST*H120
Introduction to Operating Systems
3 Credits
An introduction to the personal computer, hardware, and Operating Systems software. The most popular microcomputer operating systems and graphical interfaces will be discussed in detail. After satisfactorily completing this course, the student will have a thorough understanding of the command structures of the operating systems. Students will receive a brief introduction to local area networks from a user perspective. Laboratory projects will be assigned throughout the course to reinforce course material.
CST*H130
Networking Essentials I
3 Credits
An in-depth study of communications in a networking Environment. Included is the history of networking, OSI model, data types, signaling, multiplexing, signal conversion, data transmission, topologies, channel access method, switching techniques, SDLC, HDLC, IEEE standards, Arcnet, Ethernet, Token Ring, TCP/IP IP, SNA, and the future of networking.
CST*H235
Network Systems
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CST*H130, or a basic understanding of computer networks. This course teaches the student, through lectures, demonstrations, and classroom labs, the skills and knowledge necessary to configure, manage, and troubleshoot a Windows Server 2008 network infrastructure. The focus of this course will be the installation, configuration, management and support of DHCP and DNS. The course will also address security, the management and installation of services updates, and routing and remote access. Through the use of lab assignments, there is a heavy emphasis on the “hands-on” application of the concepts presented in the lectures and assigned readings.
CST*H236
Advanced Network Systems
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CST*H235. This advanced course will cover higher level system management features of the Window Server Operating System. The focus will be planning, implementing and maintaining an Active Directory infrastructure. Through lectures and lab assignments, the student will learn about integration of Active Directory with DNS, administration of user accounts and groups, group policies, security, remote access, and performance monitoring.
CST*H239
Servicing & Support of Local Area Networks
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CST*H130. A hands-on course allowing students to install, upgrade, maintain and troubleshoot on Microsoft server operating systems. Class discussion and laboratory exercises include Network Interface Cards (NlC’s), networking cabling, disk expansions, installations, upgrades, troubleshooting techniques, and common network problems.
CST*H248
Practices in Security Management
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSC*H101. Security Management entails the identification of an organization's information assets and the development, documentation, and implementation of policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines that ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability. This course will prepare the student to understand the planning, organization, and roles and individuals involved in security, develop security policies, and utilize management tools used to identify threats, classify assets, and rate vulnerabilities.
CST*H274
Network Security Technology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CST*H130. This course takes an in-depth look at network security concepts and techniques. Students will examine theoretical concepts that make the world of security unique. Also, this course will adopt a practical, hands-on approach when examining networking security techniques. Along with examining different network strategies, this course will explore the advancement of network implementation as well as timeless problem solving strategies.
Computer Science
CSA*H105
Introduction to Software Applications
3 Credits
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ASD-H97, ENG*H063, and MAT*H095; successful completion of placement tests. The computer plays a significant role as a productivity tool in many fields of study and in business. This course introduces the student to the basics of how to use computers as a tool rather than how computers work. It offers instruction and practice on the use of personal computers and a variety of application software. Included is work on word processing, spreadsheets, the operating system, and internet browsing. Basic computer science topics are included to the extent that they support the applications approach. A significant amount of lab work outside
CSA*H135
Spreadsheet Applications
3 Credits
Prerequisites: CSA *105 with a grade of “C” or better. The course centers on the use of the current version of MS Excel at an advanced level. Other spreadsheets will be examined, (including online-based versions) as well as the exploration of online collaboration (in Wiki fashion). The instructional methodology will consist of exploring and applying advanced spreadsheet concepts to everyday situations and problems as presented in the textbook and as created by the instructor for the class. These are selected examples: Web query (getting data from a Web site directly into Excel), Goal seek, Excel database concepts, multilevel sorts, subtotals feature, Auto Filter, templates, converting table into a range, adding calculated fields to a table, drilling entries, 3-D references, linking workbooks, advanced functions.
CSA*H205
Advanced Applications
3 Credits
Prerequisites: CSA *105 with a grade of “C” or better. This is a hands-on course that focuses on the advanced use of commonly used Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and the integration of these). The following are selected examples of skills and concepts learned in this class: 1) WORD: inserting “quick parts,” advanced mail merges, adding editing comments, using the “Track Changes” feature, inserting bookmarks and hyperlinks, and creating equations; 2) EXCEL: protecting worksheet in various ways, creating and modifying Excel tables, creating custom filters, and using advanced analysis tools, applying advanced functions; 3) ACCESS: creating tables using correct field types and properties, creating calculated fields, forms, reports, and sophisticated queries; 4) INTEGRATION: combining data and graphs in various ways using paste options, importing files from external applications, and exporting files in various formats.
CSA*H207
Computer Applications in Management & Marketing
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSA*H105 with a grade of “C” or better, BMK*H201 or BMG*H202. Designed for the career track business student, this course will supply a strong background in the computer skills necessary and useful in business/management and marketing. Specific applications will be based on IBM compatible machines using the Windows Environment, and will include work on business presentations, preparation of brochures, project scheduling, workgroup computing, and business on the internet. Additional topics will be considered.
Economics
ECN*H101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3 Credits
An introduction to the basic structure of the United States economic system is presented. Topics include: types of economic systems, characteristics of capitalism, supply and demand, inflation and unemployment, the federal reserve system, and economic policy.
ECN*H102
Principles of Microeconomics
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ECN*H101. An introduction to the problems of scarcity and resource allocation as it pertains to households and firms. The course centers on production and cost analysis in the four major types of industry models. Topics include supply and demand, elasticity, consumer choice, government in the microeconomy and price determination under various market conditions.
ECN*H130
Consumer Economics
3 Credits
Study concerns the proper management of personal income and expenditures. Topics include: a study of inflation and business cycles, commercial and savings accounts, budgets, charge accounts, installment buying use of credit, home ownership, insurance and taxes.
ECN*H250
Money and Banking
3 Credits
This course examines monetary theory and policy with special attention to the monetary system, commercial banking, the thrift industry, central banking, and capital markets.
Finance
See Academic Affairs
Fire Technology and Administration
FTA*H112
Introduction to Fire Technology
3 Credits
This course provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives.
FTA*H116
Building Construction
3 Credits
Corequisite: FTA*H112. This course provides the components of building construction related to firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.
FTA*H118
Fire Prevention and Inspection
3 Credits
Corequisite: FTA*H112. This course provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation.
FTA*H122
Fire Behavior and Combustion
3 Credits
This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled.
FTA*H126
Safety and Survival
3 Credits
This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services.
FTA*H130
Fire Technology and Administration Tech-Prep Internship
3 Credits
This course is a directed study and service opportunity for those in a Tech-Prep program. It is designed to allow the participant to develop an awareness of the fire service and provide a service opportunity benefiting both the student and the community. To participate, a student, at a minimum, must be part of a Junior/Cadet/Apprenticeship/Probationary program sponsored by a fire, rescue, emergency medical service or fire marshal’s office. To obtain college credit for this program, the student must participate in the Tech-Prep program as prescribed for his/her high school. Credit for this course will not be granted separately. The student will be assigned a mentor from his/her sponsor and the Fire Technology and Administration program of Naugatuck Valley Community College. The student will be required to complete a project designed by the Department and agreeable to the mentor from Naugatuck Valley Community College. In addition, the student will be required to complete at least two assignments one of which will be in support of the major project. Prior to the start of the program the student will be assisted in developing his/her program and what specifically will be required to obtain credit.
FTA*H210
Water Supply and Hydraulics
3 Credits
Corequisite: MAT*H167 or MAT*H172. This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems..
FTA*H216
Municipal Fire Administration
3 Credits
Prerequisite: FTA*H112. This course introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service, ethics, and leadership from the perspective of the company officer.
FTA*H218
Fire Protection Systems
3 Credits
Prerequisite: FTA*H112. This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers.
FTA*H219
Fire Investigation
3 Credits
Prerequisite: FTA*H116. Corequisite: CHE*H111 or Instructor Approval. This course is intended to provide the student with the fundamentals and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations, including recognizing and conducting origin and cause, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the fire setter, and types of fire causes.
FTA*H272
Terrorism - First Responders
3 Credits
Many of the principles that apply to Haz Mat, EMS, and crime scene responses also apply at WMD responses. This course will provide additional information to help the First Responder understand informed, controlled, and safe responses to incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. 3 contact hours.
Hospitality Management: Foodservice Management Hotel Management
Legal Assistant/Paralegal
LGL*H101
Introduction to Paralegalism
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to various aspects of the law, including but not limited to torts, contracts, criminal law and procedure and constitutional law. The course also surveys the structure and procedure of a number of court systems in the United States, and includes discussions of some topics of concern to the paralegal, including legal ethics, the rights of the elderly, the poor, the young and other disadvantaged minorities.
LGL*H102
Legal Research and Writing
3 Credits
Selected topics to develop skills in the use of legal encyclopedias, digests, reports, statutes, restatements, law reviews, and other research materials used by the legal profession are presented as an introduction to the uses of the law library. It is necessary that students do much of their legal research assignments in one of the many state or university law libraries located at various places throughout Connecticut. Students who are unable to devote several hours of research per week in one of the law libraries are advised not to enroll in LGL*H102.
LGL*H104
Real Estate Practice
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the law of real property, and includes the preparation and recording of deeds, easements, leases and other public documents, in addition to a large variety of other documents, forms and procedures that a paralegal will encounter in real estate practice.
LGL*H204
Criminal Procedure
3 Credits
This course enables the student to utilize the classroom as a learning law laboratory since it will explore the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment in detail as well as the entire United States Constitution. Constitutional law cases will be studied in the context of criminal procedure issues evolving from the precedents set by the United States Supreme Court.
LGL*H206
Bankruptcy Law
3 Credits
This course will provide students with a thorough review of the United States Bankruptcy Code. The course is tailored to explore the general functions of the Bankruptcy Court. The applicable rules and proceedings for various types of bankruptcy cases will be thoroughly discussed.
LGL*H208
Litigation
3 Credits
As an introduction to civil and criminal procedures, this course includes a survey of the functions of the federal and state court systems. The preparation of documents relative to the trial and appellate process is examined.
LGL*H209
Probate Practice and Estate Administration
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the law of wills, trusts and estates, and includes the law of intestate succession as well as a survey of the probate system. This course will help to prepare the paralegal to become fa- miliar with the various forms and documents associated with probate and estate practice.
LGL*H210
Family Law
3 Credits
This course will provide a strong background in the area of family law, with special emphasis on family law practice, including litigation. Other family law topics such as adoption, custody, community property, and child support are thoroughly investigated.
LGL*H230
Advanced Legal Issues Seminar
3 Credits
This course will be taught as a seminar and through a series of lectures. A guest speaker is also likely to participate. The problem-solving method will be used to examine critical issues in the wake of current legal events and new trends in the law.
Management
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Management
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Marketing
See Academic Affairs

Center for Academic Planning & Student Success (CAPSS)

General Studies
Liberal Arts and Sciences

Liberal Arts and Behavioral/Social Sciences

Anthropology
ANT*H101
Introduction to Anthropology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. This course is an introduction to physical and cultural anthropology. Topics include a study of genetics and evolution, the origins of man and the development of culture, human variation and race, archaeology, language and communication, marriage and family patterns, kinship and descent, religion, the arts, economic and political organization, personality and culture, and cultural change.
ANT*H121
Introduction to Archaeology
3 Credits
Archaeology is the study of past cultures and societies through examination of their material remains. The class will explore different varieties of archaeology and examine theory, methods, and techniques for investigating, reconstructing, interpreting, preserving, and ultimately, learning from the past. Students will then briefly review human cultural chronology from the time of the first people, the earliest Paleolithic ages, to the present, and deal with not only the artifact remains but also important social, economic, and even ideological questions, such as those on the origins of food production, social inequality, and civilization. Two major emphases throughout the course are archaeology as anthropology and the relevance of archaeology to modern human society and politics. The class will also examine discoveries that make the news during the semester.
ANT*H205
Cultural Anthropology
3 Credits
This course is an examination of the concept of culture as the central mode through which humans become people. Students will examine the concept of culture vs. instinct, human cultural adaptation and variation, along with cultural universals, language and communication, marriage and family patterns, kinship and descent, religion, the arts, economic and political organization, personality and culture, and cultural change.
Art
ART*H101
Art History I
3 Credits
This course is a survey of Western art and architecture from prehistory to the gothic period through an historical, cultural, and technological perspective. The class will include lectures, video and slide presentations For the art major or general student.
ART*H102
Art History II
3 Credits
This course is a survey of Western art and architecture from the early Renaissance to the present day through an historical, cultural, and technological perspective. The class will include lectures, video, and slide presentations. For the art major or general student.
ART*H111
Drawing I
3 Credits
Fundamentals of drawing and the use of line as an expressive medium are examined to show structure of form and space in still life, landscape, and the human figure. Work in a variety of media including pencil, pen and ink, wash, charcoal, and pastel is included.
ART*H112
Drawing II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ART*H111 or permission of the Division Leader. This is a continuation of ART*H111. Planned experiments using various media and the development of a personal style in drawing are offered
ART*H121
Two-Dimensional Design
3 Credits
This is an introduction to color and design in two-dimensional work in various media.
ART*H122
Three-Dimensional Design
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to three-dimensional studio techniques, use of materials, tools and media.
ART*H122
Three-Dimensional Design
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to three-dimensional studio techniques, use of materials, tools and media.
ART*H131
Sculpture I
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to sculptural form and composition through direct techniques in a variety of materials including wood, plaster, clay and plastics.
ART*H132
Sculpture II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ART*H131 or permission of the Division Leader. This is a continuation and development of techniques introduced in Art*H131 as well as involvement in more advanced processes such as kinetic, metals and large scale work. Independent work will be encouraged.
ART*H151
Painting I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ART*H111. This is a beginning course in painting in which the student is introduced to the methods and materials of painting and is encouraged to develop some proficiency in the technique of oils, acrylics, or watercolor through exploration and experimentation
ART*H152
Painting II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ART*H151 or permission of Division Leader. This is a continuation of ART*H151. Emphasis is on the development of skills and individual expression in the use of oils or acrylics.
ART*H160
Crafts
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to a variety of crafts, techniques and materials, with emphasis on individual exploration of areas of specific interest including fiber, paper, and simple printmaking. Other crafts such as enamels, leather, textiles, clay and metals may be included at the discretion of the instructor.
ART*H161
Ceramics I
3 Credits
This is an introduction to the creative possibilities of ceramic clay in pottery and sculpture through basic hand modeling techniques such as coil, slab, drape, and potter’s wheel. Firing and kiln procedures will also be covered.
ART*H162
Ceramics II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ART*H161 or permission of Division Leader. This course is a continuation of ART*H161. Concentration is on wheel thrown and hand built forms, kiln operation and glaze formation.
ART*H167
Printmaking I
3 Credits
Introduction to basic techniques in such graphic processes as silk screen, block printing, offset and dry-point etching.
GRA*H150
Introduction to Graphic Design
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the basic principles and processes of Graphic Design. Students will learn basic design, layout, and imaging skills through the use of IBM software applications for computer graphics (Quark Xpress and Adobe Illustrator). Previous drawing/design experience and computer skills are helpful.
Communications
COM*H100
Introduction to Communication
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Placement into ENG*H101. An introduction to the field of communication and to the strands of communication study: intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public communication. Students will develop communication skills as they relate to the self and to interaction in small and large groups in everyday interpersonal situations.
COM*H101
Introduction to Mass Communications
3 Credits
This course acquaints students with the complex nature of the media through which they communicate. The course will introduce the various forms of communication media; the role of media as it informs, entertains and persuades; and the effects of media on individuals and society.
COM*H157
American Film
3 Credits
Students survey American film from its beginnings to the present. The course will include the silent era, birth of sound, and typical genres.
COM*H158
International Cinema
3 Credits
A study of the origin and development of film as an art form, including the summation of outstanding films produced in France, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, India, and Japan. Discussions of documentary and short subject contributions toward this development are included.
COM*H172
Interpersonal Communication
3 Credits
This course examines the role of interpersonal communication in human relationships. The focus of this course is on improving interpersonal skills and helping students increase their communication competence in everyday social exchanges.
COM*H173
Public Speaking
3 Credits
This course provides students with an understanding, appreciation, and capacity for public speaking. Excellence in public speaking requires mastery of informative and persuasive techniques of language, organization, citation of evidence, and use of rhetorical patterns of introduction and conclusion. Exposure to theoretical elements and their application in public speaking will be explored in this class.
COM*H178
Small Group Communication
3 Credits
The purposes of this course are (a) to provide an overview of theory and research in key areas of study in small group communication, (b) to teach skills in group decision making, and (c) to give students the opportunity to apply theory, research, and decision making skills by interacting in a group environment.
COM*H202
Intercultural Communication
3 Credits
Prerequisites: COM*H101 or H172. This course will be an introduction to the major principles and theories of intercultural communication. It will emphasize the application of skills and concepts for increasing cultural awareness and communication competency in a variety of cultural contexts. Exposure to communication systems and formations from different cultures will be used as a means to provide various ways of thinking about cultures.
COM*H226
Journalism I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ENG*H101. Students explore methods and techniques of news gathering, news writing, and news analysis. By covering campus and community events, they make practical application of theory.
Criminal Justice/Public Safety
CJS*H101
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 Credits
This course introduces students to the criminal justice system on the local, state, and federal levels. Students will be exposed to the structure, function, and modern challenges faced by law enforcement, courts, and correctional agencies. (fall/spring)
CJS*H102
Introduction to Corrections
3 Credits
An overview of the history and philosophy of the American correctional system, organization and operation of the components of the corrections systems, including correctional centers, prisons, probation, parole and community-based programs, correctional treatment programs ranging from pre-trial diversion to post incarceration procedures. Presentation and discussion of current issues and problems in corrections will be discussed. (fall)
CJS*H103
Introduction to Security
3 Credits
The historic, philosophical and legal basis of security, and the role of the security officer and his relationships with the public sector are studied. The functional operation of various specialized areas of security such as theft and risk control, security surveys and loss prevention, management in proprietary and government institutions, safety and fire protection and commercial and retail security is surveyed. (fall)
CJS*H105
Introduction to Law Enforcement
3 Credits
An introduction course that covers the basics of law enforcement, evolution of the police function, the police in the criminal justice system, and the social and psychological stresses and their effects on police work, health, and the family. The course also includes the study and analysis of the problems of law enforcement as they relate to the community. (spring)
CJS*H210
Constitutional Law
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course traces the history and development of the U.S. Constitution. Topics will include the Commerce Clause, procedural due process, states’ rights and civil liberties, the concept of federal supremacy, and state constitutions. (fall)
CJS*H211
Criminal Law I
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of substantive criminal law. Major elements of statutory offenses are discussed. Reference to the Connecticut Penal Code is included. (spring)
CJS*H217
American Legal Systems
3 Credits
This course studies the process through which justice is administered and the history of the American legal system. Also examined are the Constitution of the United States as it applies to police forces. Rules of evidence with attention given to judicial notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial evidence, burden of proof, documentary evidence, hearsay evidence, confessions and admissions will also be studied. Particular emphasis will be given to evidence, arrest procedures, as well as search and seizure. (fall)
CJS*H218
Legal Aspects of Security Operations
3 Credits
This course traces the development of the legal aspects of private security in the United States. Material includes the law as it relates to private security, search and seizure, civil and criminal liability, and evidence. Legal requirements such as licensing, training, and education are also examined. (fall)
CJS*H220
Criminal Investigation
3 Credits
This is an introduction to criminal investigation. Study includes the presentation of rules and procedures of preliminary investigation; art of interrogation and recording of statements and confessions; collection and preservation of physical evidence at the crime scene; methods used in scientific interpretation of evidence; and preparation of cases for trial. (spring)
CJS*H224
Computer Crimes
3 Credits
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the various aspects of computer crimes, including hacking, computer break-ins, computer fraud, the introduction of viruses, worms, and trojan horses into computer systems, mail fraud, child pornography, pirated software, sabotage, and espionage. Study includes an overview of the various types of computer crimes likely to be encountered in today’s computer Environment, as well as the methods of preventing, investigating, and prosecuting those crimes. (fall)
CJS*H225
Forensic Science
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the recognition, preservation, and collection of physical evidence at the crime scene as well as the testing and analysis of the evidence at the forensic laboratory. The student will learn through lectures, class participation and discussion, and laboratory experiments.
CJS*H229
Crime Scene Investigation
3 Credits
This is an orientation course that covers the basics of crime scene investigation, including the crime scene, identifying and collecting evidence, and the capabilities and procedures of the crime laboratory. (fall)
CJS*H230
Security Management
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course examines the functions of an integrated security program from a management perspective. Topics to be discussed include how a security organization is managed, actual situations that may be encountered, the duties of the security director, effective management skills, and the day-to-day management of the security function. (spring)
CJS*H232
Industrial and Retail Security
3 Credits
Prerequisites: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course examines the responsibilities of industrial security in preventing security related compromises against the company, individuals, and information. Thefts in companies and retail establishments will also be examined. Among other topics to be discussed are sabotage, espionage, physical security, theft prevention, internal control, and techniques of detection, apprehension and prevention. (spring)
CJS*H233
Institutional Security
3 Credits
Prerequisites: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the role of security as it applies to public and private institutions, such as hospitals, airports, and government agencies. The student will learn how an institution can be compromised by breaches of security. Topics to be discussed include physical security, internal control, processing clearances, safeguarding classified information, and visitor and area control. (fall)
CJS*H234
Computer Security and Data Protection
3 Credits
This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of computer security and data protection. Topics that will be covered include types of attacks on computer systems, risk analysis, strategies to counter these attacks and risks, internet security, hacking, and other criminal activity. (spring)
CJS*H235
Information Warfare and Security
3 Credits
This course traces the development of information warfare, terrorism, and espionage as they relate to the computer environment. Topics include the threats to military as well as commercial and economic security. The roles of individuals, corporations, and governments in dealing with information-related attacks will be examined. The problems and remedies associated with the topics will also be examined.(spring)
CJS*H241
Correctional Counseling I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is an introduction to various concepts, principles, and techniques of counseling as applied by trained professionals in the correctional setting. Group methods, evaluation, and therapeutic Environments will be examined as a means of promoting the understanding of the counseling process. Discussions will include the various counseling models and the history of counseling in correctional institutions and the community. (fall)
CJS*H244
Community Based Corrections
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course will examine alternatives to incarceration as viable sentencing options. Topics will include: the development of community corrections, parole, diversion, halfway houses, community service, house arrest, and electronic monitoring. The role of the victim in the correctional process will also be discussed. (spring)
CJS*H246
Juvenile Corrections
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course presents the correctional aspects of the history, philosophy and development of the juvenile justice system. Topics to be discussed include the rights of juveniles, alternatives to incarceration, incarceration, treatment methods, and current and future trends. (fall)
CJS*H255
Ethical Issues In Criminal Justice
3 Credits
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the necessity for high standards of ethical and moral behavior on the part of the law enforcement officer. Material will include the consequences of unethical and immoral behavior on the part of the law enforcement officer. Topics include gratuities, favoritism, temptations, dishonesty, abuse and misuse of authority. (fall)
CJS*H261
Victim and Offender Mediation
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. The process of victim and offender mediation and reconciliation is examined in this course. The effectiveness of the process in the offender rehabilitation will be discussed. Topics to be discussed include conflict resolution, bringing the victim and offender together, restitution of losses, reconciliation, mediation, and conflict management. (spring)
CJS*H280
Victimology
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CJS*H101 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is a study of crime, its causes, and effects from the victim’s perspective. The course looks at victim precipitation, restitution, and the varied involvement in, and consequences of, crime on the victim. Major perspectives on victimization as well as patterns of victimization will be analyzed. (spring)
CJS*H293
Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience
3 Credits
Prerequisite: 12 credits in CJS*H courses, with grade of “C” or better. Cooperative Work Experience in Criminal Justice is essentially cooperative training between the school and agency. This required course introduces the student to a specific field in the Criminal Justice system. The course consists of: 1. Two-hour Professional Development Workshop 2. Minimum 145-hour (volunteer) or 225-hour (paid) Cooperative Work Experience 3. Weekly one-hour Co-op Seminar (fall/spring)
Dance
DAN*H101
History & Appreciation of World Dance
3 Credits
World Dance is designed to introduce students to dance in its creative, cultural and historical aspects. It will explore “a number of important ways in which dance functions in human societies—always keeping in mind that while dance is a universal human activity, it does not play the same role in every culture.” (Grauer) This course includes seminar, video-viewing, and movement activities.
DAN*H102
Ballet I: Renaissance to Romantic
3 Credits
Ballet from the Renaissance to the Romantic period provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of ballet technique, encourages students to achieve a level of self-discipline and physical control, and instills an appreciation of the historical contributions of ballet to the overall development of dance as an art form. Studio course.
DAN*H109
Ballroom I
1 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the history, evolution, music, steps, and various stylings of ballroom dancing. Three standard style dances, Tango or Swing, the Waltz, and the Foxtrot and three Latin style dances, the Rumba, the Salsa, and the Cha, Cha, Cha, will be explored. Studio course.
DAN*H110
Rhythm Tap
1 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the rhythm tap genre—a collage of sound produced by using taps and body as an instrument. The cultural and historical perspectives of rhythm tap will be discussed. Studio course.
DAN*H111
Jazz I: Afro-Caribbean/American
3 Credits
Afro-Caribbean and American Vernacular Jazz Dance is designed to introduce students to the origins of jazz dance in America. Study emphasizes African and Caribbean, as well as “street” and “ballroom” influences. Basic skills of jazz movement, jazz music, and rhythmic awareness are included. Studio course.
DAN*H112
Jazz II: Broadway and Film
3 Credits
No prerequisite. Musical Theater and Film Dance is designed to segue from American Vernacular Jazz Dance into concert jazz dance and Broadway dance. It continues with the historical (1930’s-2000’s) and cultural perspective particular to this American dance genre as well as its differentiating styles and techniques. Studio course.
DAN*H113
Modern I: Pioneers of America
3 Credits
Pioneers of American Modern Dance is designed to introduce students not only to the basic techniques of modern dance, but also to the social, historical, and cultural changes of the twentieth century that made America ripe for new dance forms. Important figures in the dance world from the turn of the century to 1940 will be presented, along with their techniques, theories of movement and compositional ideas. Exposure to this study will enable the students to integrate the thought behind the movement with the action. Studio course.
DAN*H118
Dance Pedagogy for Early Childhood (also listed as ECE*H118)
1 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic techniques and methodology for teaching dance to children, ages 2-5. Using the standards established by the State of Connecticut and the National Dance Education Organization, appropriate content for dance classes will be examined. We will view the dance class from a developmental perspective, identifying appropriate movement activities and strategies for teaching.
DAN*H140
Pilates/Wellness (also listed as HPE*H140)
1 Credits
This course focuses on the quality of movement, posture and breathing by increasing strength, flexibility, and balance. The holistic perspective includes physical awareness, cognitive reflection, nutrition, and insights from feelings and focuses on mind-body centering. Pilates/Wellness is designed for the dancer, athlete, health professional or persons interested in overall well-being. This class meets the first ten weeks of the semester. Comfortable clothing is necessary.
DAN*H175
Kinesiology for Dancers
3 Credits
This course, designed especially for those involved in dance, athletics or somatics, looks at the structure and function of the human body. Anatomical and mechanical principles are analyzed. We will focus on the musculoskeletal system as a mechanism for motion. Students are expected to have a foundation in dance or other body movement. This course will satisfy the science requirement for dance majors.
DAN*H202
Ballet II: Classical to Contemporary
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAN*H102. Ballet from the Classical to Contemporary periods is designed to further the student’s study of the technique of classical ballet and its history in the twentieth century. Studio course.
DAN*H209
Ballroom Dance II
1 Credits
It is strongly advised that students take DAN*H109 Ballroom I prior to taking this course or have a foundation in ballroom dance. This course is designed to expand students’ study of the history, evolution, music, steps, and styles of ballroom dancing. Three standard style dances, Swing, the Waltz, and the Foxtrot, and three Latin style dances, the Rumba, the Salsa, and the Tango, will be covered.
DAN*H213
Modern Dance II: Second Generation America
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAN*H113 or permission of instructor. This course encompasses the techniques, theories and philosophies of movement as presented by America’s second generation from Cunningham to Alvin Ailey. The social and cultural changes that influenced this period's dance also will be explored. Exposure to this study will enable the student to integrate the thought behind the movement. Studio course.
DAN*H221
Repertory/Ensemble I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Modern, Jazz or Ballet compositions by faculty or renowned choreographers will be taught, rehearsed and presented in concert. Performance skills of projection, clarity, staging, spacing and truth to choreographers’ techniques will be practiced. Works for repertory may include Charles Weidman’s Brahm’s Waltzes, Anna Sokolow’s Rooms, Balanchine’s Tarantella, and Pilobolus’ Improvisational Techniques. Studio course. Additional rehearsals required.
DAN*H222
Choreographic Principles/Ensemble I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Choreographic Principles/Ensemble is designed for students to discover sources of movement and develop the tools for structuring movement in time and space. It includes assigned composition problems and structured movement improvisation. Students may find their own personal statement in movement and develop a solo dance, and/or they may focus on making a group work. Students develop creative decision-making in working with a group. Elements of performance—costume, decor, lighting, staging—will also be explored and executed in formal concert. The Ensemble is the performing arm of the College. Studio course. Additional rehearsals required.
DAN*H224
Choreographic Principles/Ensemble II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAN*H222 and permission of instructor. This course is designed for students to expand their knowledge of movement and dance and to continue to develop the tools for structuring movement in time and space. It includes assigned compositional problems and structured movement improvisation. Students will continue to explore their own personal statement in movement and develop solos and/or group work. Students will continue to develop and demonstrate creative decision-making in working with an ensemble, both choreographically and in production. Tools and vocabulary continue to be offered in an environment open to creative communication. Elements of performance (costume, decor, lighting, staging) and production (publicity, press releases, stage and house management, scheduling) will be explored also. Participation in Dance Concert is mandatory.
DAN*H225
Repertory/Ensemble II
3 Credits
Prerequisites: DAN*H221 and permission of instructor. This course is designed to expand students’ study of dance compositions by faculty and renowned choreographers who will teach their work. Modern dance is emphasized but works may be from the jazz dance or ballet genre. The studied works will be videotaped and then rehearsed by the instructor. Students, working as an ensemble, will present these works in formal or informal concert. Performance skills of projection, clarity, staging, spacing, and truth to choreographers’ intent and technique will be further practiced. Students will continue to develop and execute production skills related to production. Participation in Dance Concert is mandatory.
DAN*H231
Jazz III: Musical Theater Dance
3 Credits
Prerequisites:  DAN*H112 or previous dance training. This course will focus on the three most influential directors/choreographers of the 20th century: Jerome Robbins, Michael Bennett and Bob Fosse.  It will reconstruct not only the dancing but the character intent in a signature piece from West Side Story (Jerome Robbins), A Chorus Line (Michael Bennett) and Chicago (Bob Fosse).  It will also emphasize the dramatics that were infused into each piece and how the emergence of the director/choreographer reshaped the American musical to what it is today.  Coursework will compare the differences and the similarities of each piece and its construction.  The three works will be informally performed by the students at the end of the course as part of their final exam. Reading and writing components are done outside of class.  Extra hours in the studio may be required. Students taking this course are expected to have a foundation in dance.
DAN*H232
Ballet III
2 Credits
Prerequisite: DAN*H202. This course continues to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of ballet technique, to encourage students to achieve a level of self-discipline and physical control, and to instill an appreciation of the historical contributions of ballet to the overall development of dance as an art form. Reading and writing component are done outside of class. Extra rehearsal hours in the studio are required.
DAN*H233
Modern Dance III: Technique/ Humphrey-Limon
2 Credits
Prerequisite: DAN*H113 and or DAN*H213. This studio course is designed to continue students’ study in the Humphrey-Limon techniques of modern dance. This twentieth century technique is the foundation of the modern dance study at this college. Presented along with Doris Humphrey’s and Jose Limon’s techniques will be their theories of movement and compositional ideas. Exposing the student to this study will enable him/her to integrate the thought behind the movement with the action. Extra rehearsal hours in the studio are required.
Digital Arts Technology
DAT *H218
Electronic Music Composition/Audio Technology I
3 Credits
(also listed as MUS*H218) Prerequisite: CSA*H105 and permission of the instructor. This course is an introduction to the art and techniques of electronic music and audio production. The history, elements, and tools of electronic music and audio will be defined and explored. Topics include; acoustic theory, analog and digital audio principles, composition, recording engineering techniques, sound sampling, electronic synthesis, MIDI, and audio for multimedia and the World Wide Web.
DAT*H101
Introduction to Digital Arts
3 Credits
Prerequisite: CSA*H105 or equivalent experience. This course is an introduction and overview of the digital arts. The basic elements, components and skills required for digital art development and production will be defined and explored. Topics include; applications of digital arts, presentation software, visual design principles, digital media design, Web design, configuring a multimedia system, emerging technologies, multimedia components, and interactive multimedia development.
DAT*H104
Multimedia Authoring I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H101. Multimedia Authoring I is an introduction to the planning, development and management of multimedia software projects, Interaction Design, and algorithm analysis. Topics include; multimedia and instructional design, multimedia and interaction design, multimedia and the WWW, arrays, functions and methods, events and event handlers, objects, logic structures, repetition structures, programming and scripting languages, and variables.
DAT*H106
Digital Design
3 Credits
Prerequisites: DAT*H101. This course explores the uses of fundamental visual design principles in emerging technologies used to design and develop interactive electronic documents such as multimedia databases, multimedia electronic books, applications for hand-held devices, and other technologies. Topics include; elements of design, principles of design, XML, and delivery engines.
DAT*H108
Digital Imaging I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H101. Digital Imaging I provides an in-depth study of digital image files and their uses in the realm of digital graphics, imaging and video. Topics include; alpha channels, composition and lighting, color theory, data compression, filters, raster graphics, vector graphics, gradients, layering, screen resolution and bit depth, and video display formats.
DAT*H110
Digital Video Production I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H101. Digital Video Production I is an introduction to the three phases of video production; pre-production, production, and post-production. Students will script, storyboard, shoot, and edit original short films. Topics include; alpha channels, aspect ratio, audio production, broadcast standards, computer monitors vs. video monitors, camera techniques, composition, compositing, compression, lighting, rolling credits, transitions, titles, and project management.
DAT*H116
Interactive Media Design
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H104. Interactive Media Design is a practical and theoretical approach to the development and application of interactive digital media for desktop, portable devices, and Web-based applications. Learners will utilize the latest technologies to design, develop and present interactive digital media content. Topics include; principles of interaction design, human-computer interaction, intermediate JavaScript and XML programming, and developing interactive PDF documents.
DAT*H205
Multimedia Authoring II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H104. Multimedia Authoring II is an intermediate-level course in the application of advanced project development tools used in the creation of interactive multimedia for the edutainment, entertainment and Web industries. Students will learn and apply techniques used to create interactive multimedia for broadcast, electronic games, and WWW applications. Topics include; algorithm analysis, animation, Interaction Design and interactivity, introduction to Human-Computer Interaction, keyframing and tweening, objects and events, Lingo scripting, timeline-based authoring, and Shockwave.
DAT*H212
3D Graphics & Animation I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H108. The 3D Graphics & Animation I course is an introduction to the design and application of digital character modeling and animation. Students will learn to design 3D modeled objects and examine and apply fundamental 2D and 3D graphic algorithms. Topics include; animation, camera and rendering, extrusions, lighting, modeling, polygons and primitives, surfaces, terrain, texture maps, transforms, and vectors.
DAT*H215
Multimedia Web Authoring
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H205. Multimedia Web Authoring utilizes the latest software technologies and methodologies to develop and deliver complete interactive multimedia software systems for Web-based applications. Topics include; advanced algorithm analysis, complex problems in Human-Computer Interaction, and advanced JavaScript and Action Script programming.
DAT*H219
Electronic Music Composition/Audio Technology II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H218/MUS*H218. This course provides intermediate instruction in digital synthesis, digital sequencing software, and electronic composition methods. Students will complete a series of directed and independent compositional projects in a variety of styles. Topic include; construction of timbres, additive and subtractive synthesis, digital sampling, signal processing, and algorithmic composition.
DAT*H220
Acoustics and Sound Design
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H101. The advanced functions of the properties of sound, human hearing, electro-acoustic instruments, digital sound reproduction systems, sound synthesis, and psychoacoustics are examined. Students will develop and participate in a number of practical sound design and audio engineering projects.
DAT*H224
Digital Video Production II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H110. This course examines advanced project development methods and tools for video production. Students will study and apply the processes involved in transforming a concept to a finished video product. Topics include; analysis, budget, copyright, scripting, storyboarding, sequencing, pre-production, production, and post-production. The learner will design, script, produce, edit, and complete an original video project.
DAT*H226
Motion Graphics for Film & Video
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H110. The study and application of state-of-the-art special effect techniques used in film and video industries will be explored. Topics include; compositing of multiple layers, masks and mattes, advanced motion controls, and advanced color keying.
DAT*H230
Digital Imaging II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H108. The advanced study of the design and manipulation of digital graphic and image files will be realized through a series of experiential projects. Topics include; photo retouching, drawing with vector paths, creating special effects with multiple layer effects, and designing images for interactive electronic media.
DAT*H234
3D Graphics & Animation II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H212. This course will explore advanced techniques for character modeling and the design of virtual space. Topics include; lighting and atmospheres, environmental structures, organic modeling, and character construction. The learner will design, model, and animate a complete 3-dimensional virtual world.
DAT*H236
Digital Illustration
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H108 or equivalent experience. This course is an exploration of vector-based illustration. The major elements, components and skills required for the production of graphics used in a variety of fields will be developed.
DAT*H237
Principles of Sound Recording
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H218 or MUS*H218. This course presents an in-depth study of the techniques and methodologies used in studio and live recording. In addition to classroom assignments and exercises, students will be expected to complete field work resulting in the recording, editing, and mastering of a live or studio project. Topics will include two-track and multi-track recording, studio acoustics and design, analog and digital mixing consoles, microphone placement techniques, signal processors, and studio session procedures.
DAT*H240
Multimedia Authoring III
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H205. This course explores advanced multimedia systems and the theoretical and practical issues in designing interactive systems. Topics include; compression techniques, synchronization, user interface accessibility, indexing and retrieval techniques, operating system support for digital audio, video, and animation file formats, as well as network and transport protocols for multimedia. Emphasis will be placed on current design and delivery issues, software implementation and discussion of future directions.
DAT*H250
Digital Arts Photography
3 Credits
This course in Digital Photography is designed to develop your skills in pixel based photographic design and printing. The dream of filmless photography has finally become a reality. Cameras, printers, inks and paper have evolved that are able to not only match traditionalcontinuous tone photographic quality, but can also extend traditional possibilities. In this first introductory course in digital photography, we will use this new found power to create, edit, post and share our images electronically. As a studio art course, you will be assessed not by tests or writing papers but mainly by your visual work leading to a final portfolio of images. Your ability to grow in the medium, try on new ideas, learn to communicate using the language of this medium, to appreciate ideas and trends in historical as well as contemporary photographic art will all contribute to your grade.
DAT*H290
Digital Arts Project
3 Credits
Prerequisite: DAT*H224 or 230 or 240. Completion of a significant project under the guidance of an advisor in an area of mutual interest such study terminating in a deliverable software/media product with technical documentation. The project must be in an area directly related to one of the three program options.
Drug and Alcohol Recovery Program (DARC)
DAR*H101
Issues in Drug and Alcohol Abuse
3 Credits
Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG*H101. This course will introduce students to the substance abuse treatment field and discuss DARC admission and certification requirements. Students will explore key topic areas such as models of recovery; history of legislation and regulation; self-help and evidenced-based approaches to recovery, ethics, and confidentiality. Public health issues related to substances will be investigated, including trends in substance use, co-occurring disorders, advertising of tobacco and alcohol, costs to society, and continuum of care from prevention to aftercare.
DAR*H111
Addiction Counseling I
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. Students will learn, practice, and develop counseling skills such as attending, reflecting, active listening, interviewing, and mirroring as it relates to addictions counseling.  Students will learn theories that are fundamental to addiction counseling and understand the relationship of theory to skills. Students will reflect on their roles as counselors and define the qualities, knowledge base, and skills essential to becoming a competent, ethical, culturally-aware counselor-in-training.
DAR*H112
Group Counseling Theory and Techniques
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. Students will be introduced to the concepts and theories of group counseling and group dynamics in the addiction field. Types of groups, group formation, and stages of group development, transitions, and termination of groups will be discussed as well as the ethical aspects of group work. Through a combination of didactic and experiential learning, students will have the opportunity to examine their own performances as group members and facilitators.
DAR*H158
Biology of Addiction
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. Students will be introduced to the basic pharmacology of drugs of abuse, and drug classification as well as the process of neurotransmission and brain functioning when drugs are introduced to the human body. Discussion of how each class of psychoactive substances alters neurotransmission and homeostasis will occur. The course examines the consequences of short- and long-term substance use, abuse, and addiction on all major bodily systems and the fetus.
DAR*H213
Addiction Counseling II
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. This course builds upon the theoretical base presented in Addiction Counseling I and will encourage further development of encouraging, paraphrasing, summarizing and reflecting of feelings as they relate to conducting intake interviews, treatment planning, counseling, and the discharge process. Students will also learn about complex issues which include GLBT populations, HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, eating disorders, relapse prevention, specialized self help groups, ethical behavior, and multicultural competencies.
DAR*H220
Co-Occurring Disorders Counseling
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG*H101. The purpose of this course is to educate students about the principles, assessment instruments, strategies, settings, and models for treating clients with co-occurring disorders in the addiction treatment setting. This course will provide education and training on models for treating co-occurring disorders, assessment practices, development of treatment plans, and counseling strategies that may be used in inpatient and outpatient settings.
DAR*H251
Counseling Internship I
6 Credits
Prerequisites: DAR*H101, 111, 112, 158; Passing grade of "C" or better for ENG*H101 and permission of the program coordinator. Students will spend 15 hours per week in a substance abuse treatment facility under the joint supervision of the DARC program Coordinator and a supervisor at the facility and attend a seminar once per week. Students will observe, practice, and develop competency in the 12 core functions of addiction counseling. As students develop increased competence, they will progress from active observers to co-counselors and then to counselors. Students will continue academic study during a weekly seminar. Students will be expected to reflect on their field work, participate in clinical supervision and peer group interaction. (fall only)
DAR*H252
Counseling Internship II
6 Credits
Prerequisite: Passing grade of “C” or better in DAR*H251; Passing grade of "C" or better for ENG*H101 and permission of DARC program coordinator. DAR*H251 and DAR*H252 must be completed in consecutive (Fall /Spring) semesters. A continuation of DAR*H 251, students will continue their field placements for 15 hours per week in the same substance abuse treatment facility. Students will refine their counseling skills and assume increased responsibility for implementing the transdisciplinary foundations and competencies required of addiction counselors. During the semester, students will function as a primary addiction counselor for one or more clients. The classroom component (weekly seminar) of this internship will prepare students for the certification exam and case presentation as well as provide for ongoing clinical supervision, personal reflection, and growth. (spring only)
Early Childhood Education
ECE*H101
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3 Credits
A study of the historical, philosophical, and social perspectives of early care and education. Emphasis will be on modern development and trends, along with an understanding of the organization and composition of early childhood education settings, which include curriculum materials, learning environments and the teacher’s role. Four three-hour observations of various types of early childhood programs and field trips are required.
ECE*H103
Creative Experiences for Children
3 Credits
This course is designed to study the concept of creativity and the creative process as it applies to art and play for young children. At the completion of this course, the student will be able to set-up a creative play environment, facilitate children's creative play and develop an art philosophy and creative art program for children.
ECE*H106
Music and Movement for Children
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101. This course is designed to have students acquire skills in order to plan and implement creative music and movement education experiences for young children. Areas of exploration will include singing, listening to music, rhythmic activities, chants, creating music, using instruments with children, multi-cultural music, creative dance and movement, musical games, music for children with special needs, and using music spontaneously in the classroom. The main goals of the course are to develop an understanding of the importance of music and movement education experiences in an early childhood environment, the role that music plays in the growth and development of young children, and how these experiences can be creatively planned, implemented, and integrated throughout the daily curriculum.
ECE*H109
Science and Math for Children
3 Credits
This course is designed to help students explore a variety of math, science, social studies and technology experiences suitable for use with young children. Math and science concepts are presented in relationship to everyday objects and experiences. Students will consider how math, science, social studies and technology concepts are embedded in classroom, family, and everyday experiences as well as how to support development of related concepts and skills.
ECE*H118
Dance Pedagogy for Early Childhood
1 Credits
(also listed as DAN*H118) This course is designed to introduce students to the basic techniques and methodology for teaching dance to children, ages 2-5. Using the standards established by the State of Connecticut and the National Dance Education Organization, appropriate content for dance classes will be examined. We will view the dance class from a developmental perspective, identifying appropriate movement activities and strategies for teaching. There is no prerequisite for this class.
ECE*H141
Infant/Toddler Growth and Development
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101. A physical examination is required by a doctor and a criminal background check are required before starting ECE*H141. An introduction to the care and teaching of infants and toddlers, which emphasizes the interrelationship between social, emotional, cognitive, physical, and language development. Age appropriate curriculum strategies will be based on developmental theories. Components of a high quality program will be explored. Students will be required to fulfill 8 weeks (4 hours per week) of field placement work with toddlers as well as complete three, 3-hour observations of infants in child care settings. Placement is determined by the coordinator.
ECE*H176
Health, Safety and Nutrition
3 Credits
The relationship between health, safety, nutrition, and child development will be explored. Emphasis will be on the strategies needed to implement a safe, healthy, and nutritionally sound program. Integration of these areas into the total curriculum will be examined.
ECE*H206
Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101 or permission of the Early Childhood Education Coordinator. An examination of the multi-dimensional role of the early childhood program director/administrator. Administrative styles, management tools, and interpersonal skills that contribute to effective leadership will be explored. Topics such as CT State licensing regulations, NAEYC accreditation, director certification, public policies, and professionalism will be discussed. (spring)
ECE*H210
Observation, Participation and Seminar
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ECE 101. A physical examination by a doctor and a criminal background check are required before starting ECE*H210. This course is designed to help students to observe, interpret, and assess children’s behavior and developmental characteristics and to increase awareness of typical and atypical patterns of behavior, as well are provided for the study of young children at the discretion of the coordinator. The students will observe and participate in an accredited center to gain experience in working with young children. In weekly seminars, students will focus on issues related to observing and understanding children’s development. Students will spend a total of 60 hours, (4 hours per week) observing, documenting, and interacting with young children in the classroom.
ECE*H215
The Exceptional Learner
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101, PSY 203 or permission of the Early Childhood Education Coordinator. The study of the “exceptional child” with emphasis on the history, laws, concepts, practices, and terminology used by professionals in the field. Accommodations and techniques used by teachers in an inclusive classroom will be covered. An observation of a preschool special education class is required.
ECE*H222
Methods and Techniques in Early Childhood Education
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101, 103, 106, 176, and 231, ENG*H101, Psy*H111, Soc*H101, should be taken concurrently with ECE-H291. The study of the knowledge and skills needed to plan, implement, and evaluate a developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum. Experiences will focus on the design of the learning environment, the interaction between teacher, child and family, classroom management, and the fostering of opportunities to enhance the development of the whole child. Guidance of children’s behavior will be explored. Written permission is required before enrollment. (spring)
ECE*H231
Early Language and Literacy Development
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101. An introduction to language and literacy development in the young child. Exploration of the early childhood language arts curriculum which includes speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills will be examined. Emphasis on the influence of a child’s cultural background and experiences on emerging literacy development will be explored. Creation of a literacy-rich environment that engages children in developmentally appropriate language arts experiences will be included. Field trips are required. (spring)
ECE*H290
Student Teaching I
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101, 103, 106, 176, and 231, ENG*H101, PSY*H111, SOC*H101. A physical examination by a doctor and a criminal background check are required before starting ECE*H290.This course is designed to develop specific skills needed by the student in order to assume the responsibilities in a classroom. Through guided supervision in the classroom and seminars, the student will gain the needed experience by putting theory into practice. The coordinator will place students in the College’s Child Development Center. Written permission is required before enrollment. Topics to be explored will include classroom management, daily schedules, curriculum and developmentally appropriate planning. The student is required to fulfill 120 hours of work experience during the semester. (8 hours per week minimum) (fall)
ECE*H291
Student Teaching II
3 Credits
Prerequisites: ECE*H101, 103, 106, 176, 231, and 290, ENG*H101, PSY*H111, 204, SOC*H101. A physical examination by a doctor and a criminal background check are required before starting ECE*H291. This course is a continuation of ECE*H290. During this phase of the work experience, the student will concentrate on working directly with young children. The overall objectives are for the student to be able to manage a classroom independently, plan, organize, execute, and evaluate classroom activities on a weekly basis, and be able to critique effectively one’s role in the classroom. The student will be under the supervision of an on-site supervisor and the College instructor. Individual placements are under the direction of the Coordinator which includes eight hours per week in the Child Development Center and four hours per week in another setting. Written permission is required before enrollment. The student is required to fulfill 192 hours of work experience for the semester. (12 hours per week minimum) (spring)
English
ALP/ENG*H063
3 Credits
This course will enhance the student’s confidence in expressing ideas and provide practice with sound writing mechanics. Emphasis is placed on practicing the writing process with a focus on rhetorical methods; skills are taught within the context of essay writing. In addition, students will read, critically assess and write as a response to the readings. Library and research techniques are practiced. This course requires a minimum of six (6) hours of outside work per week. This course is part of the Accelerated Learning Program combination of ENG*H063 and ENG*H101. Placement into the course(s) will be determined by Accuplacer scores: RC 72-82 and SS 72-87. Students registered for both CRNs will have the opportunity to receive credit for both courses. These courses run in consecutive time blocks: ENG*H101 is the primary course and will be offered first, then ENG*H063 will continue through the second block as a workshop to support the work offered in ENG*H101. In the ENG*H063 class, students will prepare for and review questions from ENG*H101, write short papers to reinforce concepts taught in ENG*H101, review drafts, and work on reducing writing errors. Requirements for attendance in either one or both classes will be made on an individual basis. 3 Credits for ENG*H101 and 3 credits for ENG*H063 (not toward graduation). Student MUST receive a C or better (73) to pass this course.
ENG*H096
Introduction to College English
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Appropriate score on placement test, or approval from Division Leader or advisor. This course is designed to prepare students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college-level courses by integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading and writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation.
ENG*H101
Composition
3 Credits
Prerequisite: “C” or better in ENG*H096, or "C" or better in ESL, or successful completion of placement tests, appropriate SAT score or recommendation of the Associate Dean of LABSS and instructor. May not be taken concurrently with any other English course except ENG*H063. This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of writing and to develop their critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. The class will focus on the writing of expository essays, often in response to complex readings. This course will emphasize the necessity of revision as a means of producing college-level writing. Intensive library and research techniques are an integral part of this course.
ENG*H102
Literature and Composition
3 Credits
Prerequisite: “C” or better in ENG*H101 or recommendation of the Associate Dean of LABSS and instructor. This advanced writing course is designed to refine student's critical reading and writing skills through in-depth analysis of literary genres such as fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will engage in sophisticated writing assignments which emphasize the importance of authoritative research and complex logical reasoning, interpretation, and argumentation. Students will apply literary theories while developing their understanding and appreciation of literature and its relationship to society. ENG*H102 is an academic core course.
ENG*H200
Advanced Composition
3 Credits
Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENG*H101 or recommendation of the Associate Dean of LABSS and instructor. This advanced writing course is designed to refine student's critical reading and writing skills through in-depth analysis of intellectually challenging texts. Students will engage in sophisticated writing assignments which emphasize the importance of authoritative research and complex logical reasoning, and argumentation. Topics to be addressed will be contemporary cultural issues central to present day academic discourse.
ENG*H202
Technical Writing
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ENG*H101. This course involves the student in the study and practice of the basic skills and principles of technical writing for business and industry. The practice of writing is emphasized; graphic and design elements including designing visual formats are given secondary emphasis. The course focuses on the fundamental skills and formats of letter/memos, instructions, proposals, reports, and layperson writing (communicating difficult subjects to general audiences). Individual instructors may add other subjects.
ENG*H211
Short Story
3 Credits
Prerequisite: ENG*H102 or ENG*H200. This course is a study of the framework and the major movements, writers and works of short fiction. Emphasis is given to the various attempts to portray the response to the complexity of life and to examine the role of literature. It will, further, focus on the study of short prose fiction in order to