Goal Two: NVCC Faculty and Staff Make a Difference.

Cultivating the academic gravitas, administrative effectiveness, student engagement, and community involvement of our faculty and staff makes NVCC a stronger institution.

To achieve this goal, we have identified three initiatives that encourage and recognize the leadership of professionals in meeting the many needs of our diverse constituencies, on and off campus.

 

 

 

 

Expand Faculty and Staff Development

Educators  and  administrators  in  higher  education today experience somewhat of a double bind. Colleges must operate on extremely tight budgets, with fewer faculty and staff to share management responsibilities inside  and  outside  the  classroom.  At  the  same  time, as  higher  education  becomes  more  rigorously  data- driven   and   results-oriented,   faculty   and   staff   must devote more attention to ensuring that methods remain state-of-the-art. [8]

This initiative will offer professional development for faculty and staff, exposing them to a variety of training opportunities—from academic advisement and customer service, to performance-based decision-making. We will also explore ways to strengthen recognition of faculty and staff leadership in their fields, college, and community. By 2016, our hope is to provide all faculty and staff with opportunities to participate, so that we can even better model for our students the value of lifelong learning and always aspire to become better at what we do.

Activity Areas of Focus:

Survey all NVCC units to determine the training needs that will support the college’s strategic goals.

Create a faculty and staff development and recognition plan that incorporates the Center for Teaching, union- funded professional development, and other providers.

Seek external funding to support the high-cost elements of the faculty and staff development plan.

Develop assessment methods that track participation and outcomes.


Deepen Volunteerism, Mentoring and Service Learning

Many colleges are exploring ways to strengthen civic engagement among students, faculty and staff. The reasons are both philosophical (that higher education has a significant role to play in building an engaged citizenry that supports a more vibrant democracy) and pragmatic (that these experiential learning opportunities can yield positive student learning and employment outcomes for students).[9]

NVCC already has an active student body and engaged faculty and staff, with more than 39 student clubs and student-centered organizations, and more than 100 faculty, staff, and students participating in campus- and community-based volunteer and mentoring activities. In recent years, the Behavioral and Social Sciences Division pioneered theme-based service learning in which more  than 53 students have worked on course-related community service opportunities that they self-identified and designed. By 2016, NVCC will expand its civic engagement efforts, so that more students, faculty, and staff can benefit from these experiences on and off campus.

Activity Areas of Focus:

Reach out to the Student Government Association (SGA) to engage all student clubs in dialogue about ways that they can serve as campus and community activists and advocates.

Connect faculty and staff with community residents via online lectures on topics of mutual interest.

Expand   the   mentoring   program   to   include   more student, alumni, and community/industry mentors.

Strengthen collaboration among AmeriCorps and academic divisions to create more volunteer activities and service learning opportunities for our students.

Increase partnerships with community institutions, including sister schools to model the Brother to Brother and Sister to Sister mentoring programs that support students from underrepresented groups.

Improve Equity and Outcomes for Underrepresented Groups

Community colleges are primary entry points to higher education for many underrepresented groups. They enroll 44 % of African American, 45% of Asian or Pacific Islander, and 51% and 54%, respectively, of Hispanic and Native American undergraduates.[10]  They enroll 42% of first- generation college students.[11] Bottom line, they represent more  accessible and affordable  post-secondary options for many, especially those from middle- to low-income families. And their accessibility parlays beyond learning. It also can help lift people, especially those born into poor families, out of poverty. Indeed, the effect can be dramatic, with some recent studies showing for those born into the poorest fifth of American families, a college degree gives them an 80% chance of bettering their economic status during their lifetimes.[12]

A commitment to providing open access and opportunity for all underlies NVCC’s mission and values. While our campus has grown more diverse in recent years, more focus is needed to boost representation among key racial and ethnic groups, as well as those who are economically disadvantaged. By 2016, this initiative will help ensure a more inclusive student body that represents the diverse demographics of our service region.

Activity Areas of Focus:

Expand outreach to students from underrepresented groups to increase awareness, engagement and participation in Bridge to College retention activities and programs.

Establish an engagement plan based on student needs and interests. The plan will include activities (first- generation club, peer tutoring), outreach strategies, and student outcomes.

Identify key community partners including the School District of Waterbury, New Opportunities, YMCA, Opportunities Industrialization Center, and Brass City Harvest to collaborate with the Bridge to College Office to engage students from underrepresented groups.

Our Latest Accomplishments
NVCC Honored with Marketing Awards

NVCC Honored with Marketing Awards

NVCC's marketing publications are honored with awards from NCMRP.

Author: Smith, Tara
0 Comments
Article rating: No rating
Professor Commemorates History of JET Magazine in Final Print Issue

Professor Commemorates History of JET Magazine in Final Print Issue

Juleyka Lantigua-Williams chosen to author JET's last-ever print cover story

“I was honored to be considered and accepted the assignment thankfully,” said Lantigua-Williams, who wrote for the magazine on topics ranging from politics to the arts, personal profiles, and education over the last three years. Her first JET cover story, “Fade to Black” (April 2013), is currently a finalist for a National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Excellence in Journalism Award.

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating
2014 Educational Excellence Award Goes to English Professor Beth Ann Scott

2014 Educational Excellence Award Goes to English Professor Beth Ann Scott

In higher education, our students’ testimony is the most powerful affirmation of the value of the work we do each and every day. This year, NVCC recognizes English Professor Beth-Ann Scott with the 2014 Educational Excellence Award.

0 Comments
Article rating: 5.0
Public Safety Delivers First Annual Meritorious Service Award

Public Safety Delivers First Annual Meritorious Service Award

Officer Gary Heyward receives committee's unanimous nomination

The First Annual Public Safety Meritorious Service Award for 2014 goes to Building & Grounds Officer Gary Heyward. Officer Heyward has been employed as a Building and Grounds Officer at NVCC since June 13, 1977 and has demonstrated true character and professionalism every day since.

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating
NVCC Women's Month 2014 Honorees

NVCC Women's Month 2014 Honorees

13 Women Are Recognized for Their Academic Achievement in the Face of Adversity

At a high tea ceremony held Thurs., March 6, 2014, members of the campus community gathered together to honor the extraordinary lives and achievements of 13 outstanding female NVCC students. The awardees were nominated by faculty and staff whose lives have been inspired by their students’ strength, patience, commitment and endurance to persist both personally and academically.

0 Comments
Article rating: No rating
RSS
Indicators of Success

Faculty and Staff Development

  • Faculty and staff participate more in professional development
  • Evidence of skills improvements that correlate to student success

Volunteerism, Mentoring, Service Learning

  • Faculty, staff, and students participate more
  • Evidence of participation positively impacting teaching and learning, as well as student outcomes

Equity and Outcomes for Underrepresented Groups

  • Increased representation within enrollment, retention, and graduation of students
Supported By
References

8 Killion, J. Assessing Impact: Evaluating Staff Development. National Staff Development Council, 2008. 9 The National Task Force on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement. 2012. A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy’s Future. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. 10 American Association of Community Colleges 2012 Fact Sheet. 11 Ibid. 12 The Economic Case for Higher Education, U.S. Treasury Department, 2012. American Colleges and Universities.